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News stories tagged with "wildlife"

The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.

Ready, set, count! BioBlitz starts Sunday morning in Newcomb

Visitors to the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb on Sunday will get a close-up look at wildlife. The annual BioBlitz is a one-day, rapid inventory of animal and plant life. Professional biologists will join citizen scientists to study and catalog wildlife in the Adirondacks, including salamanders, bees, mushrooms and wildflowers.

Todd Moe spoke with Ezra Schwartzberg about the expert-led species inventory teams that will discover, count, map, and learn about the park's biodiversity along lakeshores, marshes and forests.  Go to full article
Wood Frog. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikemcd/3623351755">Michael McDonough</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wood Frog. Photo: Michael McDonough, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

State Senate claims wood frog for New York

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The wood frog is one more hop closer to becoming New York's official amphibian.

The state Senate voted 50-4 on Tuesday to add it to the list alongside other official animals such as the blue bird, beaver, brook trout and snapping turtle.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/21585925@N07/3988403205/">Parry</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Parry, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

The way we understand animals is human-centric

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about how we understand animal behavior and the natural world through the human perspective.  Go to full article
Black bear. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/8749778@N06/12033862626/">Eric Kilby</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Black bear. Photo: Eric Kilby, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

DEC adopts10-year black bear management plan

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The Department of Environmental Conservation is adopting a 10-year plan to monitor and manage black bear populations in the state.

Several revisions were made to the plan after public comments were reviewed. One change clarified that the agency plans to assess the pros and cons of using dogs, bait or cable restraints for taking bears, although none of the measures are currently proposed for use.  Go to full article
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb.  Photo: Paul Hai
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb. Photo: Paul Hai

Newcomb season starts with loons and logs on Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its third rubber loon race on Saturday. It's an opportunity to get outside, rain or shine, and connect with nature. Other activities will include a bird walk, a presentation on "plein air" art by Artist-in-Residence Frances Gaffney, and Windy Baker will lead an Adirondack chair building workshop.

The art and outdoors events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's third year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
A kangaroo "joey" has a long way to go before it gets to the cute stage. It begins as a tiny, fragile, hairless newborn in its mother's pouch. Photos: Mother and joey, <a href="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2215/2179798100_85f711ebfc_o_d.jpg">Subhash Chandra</a>; Newborn joey in pouch: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Joey_in_pouch.jpg">Geoff Shaw</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A kangaroo "joey" has a long way to go before it gets to the cute stage. It begins as a tiny, fragile, hairless newborn in its mother's pouch. Photos: Mother and joey, Subhash Chandra; Newborn joey in pouch: Geoff Shaw, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

The early life of kangaroos

Kangaroos are marsupials, mammals who have a protective pouch in which they raise their young until they are developed enough to endure conditions in the outside world. What most people might not know is that the birth of kangaroos in a pouch is in some ways more complex than the birth and development of other mammals.

Martha Foley talks with Dr. Curt Stager about kangaroos and their young, known as joeys.  Go to full article

Young moose on the loose in Burlington, Winooski

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) A young moose made its way into Burlington and over to Winooski, where it was spotted in parks, yards, parks and city streets.

The police dispatch centers in Burlington and South Burlington and 911 received many reports Tuesday morning about the presence of the moose.  Go to full article
A Willow Ptarmigan along eastern Lake Ontario. The sighting this week is a first for New York State.  Photo: Jeff Bolsinger.
A Willow Ptarmigan along eastern Lake Ontario. The sighting this week is a first for New York State. Photo: Jeff Bolsinger.

Willow Ptarmigan becomes an avian celebrity near Watertown

Carloads of birders from across the region have visited the shore of Lake Ontario, near Watertown, over the last few days hoping to glimpse a rare avian visitor from the Arctic tundra.

Late last week, Eugene Nichols was birding near Point Peninsula and found an all white bird that didn't belong in northern New York. Nichols contacted Jeff Bolsinger, a bird biologist at Fort Drum, who confirmed that it's a Willow Ptarmigan. Bolsinger says the bird normally lives only in northern Canada and Alaska. He says the sighting this week is the first documented sighting of a Willow Ptarmigan in New York State, and the second recorded in the lower 48 states in a century.

Bolsinger told Todd Moe he's not sure how the bird ended up this far south, but it's become an instant celebrity in the birding community.  Go to full article
A male bumblebee about to alight on an alumroot. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bumblebee_heuchera.jpg">Sjjubs</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A male bumblebee about to alight on an alumroot. Photo: Sjjubs, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

How bumblebees keep warm

Bees need to be warm in order to fly. That's usually not a problem, since it takes millions of round trips to flowers to make a pound of honey. But should they fall idle long enough to cool down, bees fire up their wing muscles by shivering. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley, with more about bees.  Go to full article
Tiger. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cheddarcheez/">Phil Holker </a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Tiger. Photo: Phil Holker , Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Fulton County man fights to keep his big cats

MAYFIELD, N.Y. (AP) A state appeals court has given a Fulton County man 30 days to get rid of his cats: three tigers and two leopards.

The Gloversville Leader-Herald reports that the state Supreme Court Appellate Division on Thursday upheld a lower court ruling against Steven Salton of Mayfield. Salton claimed the town Zoning Board was incorrect in determining his animals were part of a business.  Go to full article

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