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News stories tagged with "wildlife"

A shelf of chachkes at Candy Cottage in Old Forge, NY. Photo: Natasha Haverty
A shelf of chachkes at Candy Cottage in Old Forge, NY. Photo: Natasha Haverty

In Old Forge, can bears stay wild and coexist with humans?

The hamlet of Old Forge sees huge numbers of tourists this time every year. Many people come from all over the country to have their annual wilderness experience, along with all the creature comforts of Old Forge's main street.

But for years, residents of Old Forge and wildlife experts have been working to strike a balance with tourists: how to let humans have their fun but keep the wild animals of the Adirondack park like bears, wild, without turning any of that tourism away.  Go to full article
Wild Center visitors Manny and Betsy, use watercolors, brushes and sponges to paint trees in the open studio art space at the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Todd Moe
Wild Center visitors Manny and Betsy, use watercolors, brushes and sponges to paint trees in the open studio art space at the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Todd Moe

Art in the park: when nature meets art at the Wild Center

Visitors to the Wild Center in Tupper Lake this summer are being encouraged to pick up a paintbrush or camera and capture a moment in the natural world. It's part of a multimedia exhibit that includes videos, photographs, original art by renowned watercolorist Allen Blagden and an interactive studio space for creating new art.

Todd Moe visits the new "Moments" exhibit at Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks, and talks with curator Caroline Welsh about using art to better understand nature and the environment.  Go to full article
Allen Blagden traveled to the Wild Center to paint the resident porcupine Stickley especially for the "Moments" exhibit.  Photo: Wild Center
Allen Blagden traveled to the Wild Center to paint the resident porcupine Stickley especially for the "Moments" exhibit. Photo: Wild Center

Watercolorist Allen Blagden inspires "Moments" exhibit in Tupper Lake

The art of one of the nation's best watercolorists is on display at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake. It's part of the inspiration for the "Moments, Reimagining Nature through Art" exhibit. The interactive display, that's part multi-media, part art show, part hands-on art project, encourages visitors to engage with nature through art.  Go to full article
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.
The 2014 BioBlitz starts Sunday morning at 8:30 at the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb.

Ready, set, count! BioBlitz starts Sunday morning in Newcomb

Visitors to the Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb on Sunday will get a close-up look at wildlife. The annual BioBlitz is a one-day, rapid inventory of animal and plant life. Professional biologists will join citizen scientists to study and catalog wildlife in the Adirondacks, including salamanders, bees, mushrooms and wildflowers.

Todd Moe spoke with Ezra Schwartzberg about the expert-led species inventory teams that will discover, count, map, and learn about the park's biodiversity along lakeshores, marshes and forests.  Go to full article
Wood Frog. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikemcd/3623351755">Michael McDonough</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Wood Frog. Photo: Michael McDonough, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

State Senate claims wood frog for New York

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The wood frog is one more hop closer to becoming New York's official amphibian.

The state Senate voted 50-4 on Tuesday to add it to the list alongside other official animals such as the blue bird, beaver, brook trout and snapping turtle.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/21585925@N07/3988403205/">Parry</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Parry, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

The way we understand animals is human-centric

Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about how we understand animal behavior and the natural world through the human perspective.  Go to full article
Black bear. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/8749778@N06/12033862626/">Eric Kilby</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Black bear. Photo: Eric Kilby, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

DEC adopts10-year black bear management plan

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) The Department of Environmental Conservation is adopting a 10-year plan to monitor and manage black bear populations in the state.

Several revisions were made to the plan after public comments were reviewed. One change clarified that the agency plans to assess the pros and cons of using dogs, bait or cable restraints for taking bears, although none of the measures are currently proposed for use.  Go to full article
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb.  Photo: Paul Hai
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb. Photo: Paul Hai

Newcomb season starts with loons and logs on Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its third rubber loon race on Saturday. It's an opportunity to get outside, rain or shine, and connect with nature. Other activities will include a bird walk, a presentation on "plein air" art by Artist-in-Residence Frances Gaffney, and Windy Baker will lead an Adirondack chair building workshop.

The art and outdoors events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's third year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
A kangaroo "joey" has a long way to go before it gets to the cute stage. It begins as a tiny, fragile, hairless newborn in its mother's pouch. Photos: Mother and joey, <a href="https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2215/2179798100_85f711ebfc_o_d.jpg">Subhash Chandra</a>; Newborn joey in pouch: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Joey_in_pouch.jpg">Geoff Shaw</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A kangaroo "joey" has a long way to go before it gets to the cute stage. It begins as a tiny, fragile, hairless newborn in its mother's pouch. Photos: Mother and joey, Subhash Chandra; Newborn joey in pouch: Geoff Shaw, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

The early life of kangaroos

Kangaroos are marsupials, mammals who have a protective pouch in which they raise their young until they are developed enough to endure conditions in the outside world. What most people might not know is that the birth of kangaroos in a pouch is in some ways more complex than the birth and development of other mammals.

Martha Foley talks with Dr. Curt Stager about kangaroos and their young, known as joeys.  Go to full article

Young moose on the loose in Burlington, Winooski

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) A young moose made its way into Burlington and over to Winooski, where it was spotted in parks, yards, parks and city streets.

The police dispatch centers in Burlington and South Burlington and 911 received many reports Tuesday morning about the presence of the moose.  Go to full article

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