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News stories tagged with "water"

Lake Mohonk. Photo: Jenna Flanagan, Innovation Trail
Lake Mohonk. Photo: Jenna Flanagan, Innovation Trail

Rethinking water resources to combat climate change

Catastrophic storms like Irene, Lee and super storm Sandy ravaged much of the Hudson River watershed with flooding and erosion. Environmental advocates and policy makers say that's evidence that climate change is having a major impact on the quantity and quality of the region's water supplies.

Stakeholders joined the Hudson River Watershed Alliance and Mohonk Consultations for a conference in New Paltz last week. They called for communities to seize this 'watershed moment' while admitting that changing existing attitudes towards water management can take a long time.  Go to full article
The majority of the plastic that Mason and her team found were tiny pieces called microplastics. Photo: 5 Gyres
The majority of the plastic that Mason and her team found were tiny pieces called microplastics. Photo: 5 Gyres

Microplastics a problem in the Great Lakes

Plastics are a part of modern life--they're in everything. Plastics are even in our skin care products. Exfoliating beads called microbeads in many facial scrubs are made of plastic, and they're making an appearance in a new study that looks at how much plastic ends up in the Great Lakes, and how it gets there.

The Allegheny Front's Kara Holsopple reports that the little beads may mean big problems for wildlife and human health.  Go to full article
Instructions for 'CrowdHydrology.' Photo: Ashley Hassett
Instructions for 'CrowdHydrology.' Photo: Ashley Hassett

Buffalo-based project crowdsources water level tracking

A nationwide project based in New York is using crowd sourcing to gather up-to-date information on water levels.

The program's a partnership between the US Geological Service and the University of Buffalo. It's proving more and more useful at the USGS cuts back on the number of water monitoring stations across the country.  Go to full article
Boats sit along the Erie Canal in Fairport, NY. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/2793824699/">J. Stephen Conn</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Boats sit along the Erie Canal in Fairport, NY. Photo: J. Stephen Conn, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NYS canals expect 20-year high in commercial traffic

While often seen as an economic lifeline of another era, New York's canals are poised to have a big year for moving freight; almost two centuries after goods were first transported on the upstate New York waterway.

As the state's network of canals opens this week for its 189th official season, commercial traffic along the waterways is expected to be at a two-decade high.

The Canal Corporation, the agency that oversees the 524 miles of canals, expects more than 100,000 tons of freight to move through upstate by way of the Erie Canal and its other canals.  Go to full article
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. In his letter, Dr. Nirav Shah says some other states didn't seriously study health concerns before allowing hydrofracking. Photo: Marie Cusick
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. In his letter, Dr. Nirav Shah says some other states didn't seriously study health concerns before allowing hydrofracking. Photo: Marie Cusick

NYS fracking health study won't make its deadline

It looks like the decision on whether to allow large-scale hydraulic fracturing in New York state will probably be delayed. In a letter this afternoon, State Health Commissioner Nirav Shah wrote his department needs more time to investigate fracking's potential health impacts. Shah said that's because the issues they're considering are very complex.  Go to full article
Spiny water flea. Photo: J. Liebig, NOAA
Spiny water flea. Photo: J. Liebig, NOAA

Few options for control of spiny water flea

Discovery of the spiny water flea in Lake George has heightened worries that the invasive species will eventually move into Lake Champlain.

And it's brought new attention to the danger of the Champlain Canal, an open waterway between Lake Champlain and the Hudson River.

This past summer, spiny water fleas were found in the canal, and in several areas of Lake George as well. That triggered a quick response from a task force of New York and Vermont experts.  Go to full article
The sun breaks water in the atmosphere down into hydrogen and oxygen. Image: US DOE
The sun breaks water in the atmosphere down into hydrogen and oxygen. Image: US DOE

Natural Selections: Did a dinosaur drink my water?

In an earlier conversation on the natural world, Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talked about the longevity of atoms, and how atoms within our body may have once been in the bodies of dinosaurs. But the question remains, is that true of water? How old is it, really?  Go to full article
Photo: http://www.onondagalake.org
Photo: http://www.onondagalake.org

Onondaga Lake sees cleaner, brighter future

Onondaga Lake sits right next to downtown Syracuse, and after that city's factories poured countless toxic chemicals and sludge into the water over more than 100 years, Onondaga became known as the most polluted lake in America. But today the final stage of a cleanup is underway.  Go to full article
Photo: Emma Jacobs
Photo: Emma Jacobs

New study finds risks in dealing with wastewater from hydrofracking

A new study says there are shortfalls in dealing with the massive amounts of contaminated water created through hydraulic fracturing.

The study by Stony Brook University finds the highest risk of flowback water contaminating water supplies occurs during the disposal process.  Go to full article
The International Joint Commission in St Armand, Quebec
The International Joint Commission in St Armand, Quebec

Public hearings in VT, Quebec on phosphorus in Lake Champlain's Missisquoi Bay

Missisquoi Bay is in the northeast corner of Lake Champlain, along the Vermont-Quebec border. The bay has some of the highest phosphorus concentrations in the lake and is frequently plagued by blue/green algae. In 2008, the US government asked the International Joint Commission, a bi-national body that helps manage US and Canadian boundary waters, to assist in reducing phosphorus levels in the bay.

They've now completed a study that identifies where the phosphorus is coming from and how it gets to the lake. Two public hearings are underway to discuss the results. Sarah Harris was at last night's meeting in Saint Armand, Quebec and has more.  Go to full article

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