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News stories tagged with "st-lawrence-river"

Scott Ouderkirk at work in his studio near Hammond.  The 1932 Keck stained glass window is from a church in Elmira, NY.   Photo:  Todd Moe
Scott Ouderkirk at work in his studio near Hammond. The 1932 Keck stained glass window is from a church in Elmira, NY. Photo: Todd Moe

A glass act along the St. Lawrence

Dozens of St. Lawrence County artists will open their doors to the public this weekend during the annual Artists Studio Tour. NCPR is media sponsor for the event.

Todd Moe stopped by the studio of Hammond artist Scott Ouderkirk, for a chat about his passion for glass art using medieval-era techniques.  Go to full article
Deborah Dunleavy as Bea Tompkins in <i>At the Canoe Club Dance</i>. The show opens Friday night (8 pm) at the Ourtown Theatre in Gananoque, Ontario.  Photo: Deborah Dunleavy
Deborah Dunleavy as Bea Tompkins in At the Canoe Club Dance. The show opens Friday night (8 pm) at the Ourtown Theatre in Gananoque, Ontario. Photo: Deborah Dunleavy

Preview: "At the Canoe Club Dance" in Gananoque

Brockville storyteller Deborah Dunleavy tells us about creating and performing her one-woman show, "At the Canoe Club Dance". She collected stories from seniors about life along the St. Lawrence in the 1940's, and her show includes stories, songs and music from the Swing Era. It opens in Gananoque on Friday night.  Go to full article
A Seaway freighter passes under the bridge near Massena in December 2012.  Photo: David Sommerstein.
A Seaway freighter passes under the bridge near Massena in December 2012. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Seaway tonnage down 11%

The St. Lawrence Seaway is still trying to dig itself out of a recession slump. After posting a 4% tonnage increase last year, shipping between Great Lakes and foreign ports is down 11% so far this year.

Seaway officials were hoping to build on last year's gains. But a weak global steel market is dragging down demand for iron ore from the Midwest. And Canadian grain is increasingly going by train to the West Coast on its way to Asia.  Go to full article
R. M. Doyon.    Photo:  courtesy the author.
R. M. Doyon. Photo: courtesy the author.

Books: "Thou Torturest Me"

Canadian author R. M. Doyon's new novel, Thou Torturest Me, is a sequel to his debut novel, Upcountry. Set in upstate New York, Upcountry fans will recognize many of their favorite characters in this second volume. Todd Moe spoke with R.M. Doyon from his home on Howe Island in the Thousand Islands. Doyon says his new book is filled with love, loss, hope and culture clashes between mainstream society and the sometimes misunderstood Amish.  Go to full article
DEC fisheries technician David Gordon unsnarls fish from gill nets designed to catch a representative cross-section of the river's fishery. Photo: David Sommerstein.
DEC fisheries technician David Gordon unsnarls fish from gill nets designed to catch a representative cross-section of the river's fishery. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Netting a snapshot of the St. Lawrence River fishery

Every year since 1976, state environmental technicians have set nets across the St. Lawrence River to see what fish they catch. The result is a sort of snapshot of the river's fishery.

David Sommerstein bumped into the Department of Environmental Conservation crew last month at Coles Creek marina. They were prying big and little fish from nets and tossing them into buckets for testing. Roger Klint is an aquatic biologist with the Department of Environmental Conservation and leads the DEC's annual index of fish populations in the St. Lawrence River.  Go to full article
The Long Sault Dam is part of the hydropower generating complex on the St. Lawrence River near Massena. Photo: New York Power Authority
The Long Sault Dam is part of the hydropower generating complex on the St. Lawrence River near Massena. Photo: New York Power Authority

St. Lawrence river towns seek more NYPA compensation

St. Lawrence County and four towns want more compensation for the negative effects of producing hydropower on the St. Lawrence River near Massena.

The communities say a lot has changed since their last talks ten years ago with the New York Power Authority, which owns the power dam.  Go to full article
Limnologist Michael Twiss from Clarkson University. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Limnologist Michael Twiss from Clarkson University. Photo: David Sommerstein.

A mystery at the bottom of the Great Lakes food web

Phytoplankton - the algae that are food for plankton which in turn feed fish - are behaving strangely. They're surrounded by a nutrient they need to grow. But for some reason, they're not using it.

The puzzle has big implications for how scientists think about the Great Lakes' future in a warming world. David Sommerstein reports from the St. Lawrence River.  Go to full article
David Fox and R.H. Thomson play brothers Calum and Alexander in "No Great Mischief".  The show opens Friday night (8 pm) at the Thousand Islands Playhouse.  Photo: Thousand Islands Playhouse
David Fox and R.H. Thomson play brothers Calum and Alexander in "No Great Mischief". The show opens Friday night (8 pm) at the Thousand Islands Playhouse. Photo: Thousand Islands Playhouse

Preview: "No Great Mischief"

Love, loss, family history and Scottish ancestry are at the heart of a play that opens Friday night in the Springer Theatre at the Thousand Islands Playhouse in Gananoque, Ontario. No Great Mischief is based on the novel by Alistair MacLeod. It's the story of two brothers, Calum and Alexander, who seek to reconcile their past.

Todd Moe spoke with Canadian actor R.H. Thomson, who plays Alexander MacDonald, in the show. He says it's a memory play that takes viewers from a squalid rooming house in Toronto to Cape Breton to the deep mines of Elliot Lake.  Go to full article
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wine and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The North Country has almost two dozen wineries. The state legislature recently designated an Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to draw attention to a pocket of vineyards near Lake Champlain.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking" - breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot. David Sommerstein reports from a vineyard in the Thousand Islands.  Go to full article
"Island Dave" is a familiar, friendly face around the city of Brockville's islands on the St. Lawrence. Photo: David Sommerstein.
"Island Dave" is a familiar, friendly face around the city of Brockville's islands on the St. Lawrence. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Listen: 'Island Dave' has the job you want in the Thousand Islands

Whether it's the Adirondacks or the St. Lawrence River, everyone's getting in their last licks of summer this week.

The city of Brockville owns 16 park islands on the St. Lawrence that are busy with boats docking and people picnicking and camping.

Many boaters are familiar with the friendly face who manages and patrols the area. Listen to today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

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