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News stories tagged with "mckibben"

Climate change activists gather at Paul's Bakery in Upper Jay on Saturday. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise
Climate change activists gather at Paul's Bakery in Upper Jay on Saturday. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily Enterprise

A personal connection to climate change

Nearly 40 people gathered at Paul Johnson's home in Upper Jay on Saturday to draw attention to the ways climate change has affected peoples' lives.

The event, called Connect the Dots, was part of Climate Impacts Day, which featured hundreds of similar gatherings worldwide. It was organized by local members of the international climate action organization 350.org, started by former Adirondack writer Bill McKibben. Chris Morris was there and has this report.  Go to full article
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann
A Trans Canada worker inspects a pumping station in Steele City, Nebraska. Photos: Brian Mann

New York and the US look to Canada for energy, raising big questions about the environment

North Country congressman Bill Owens is praising a Canadian company for its plan to move forward with construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. Owens' backing for the controversial pipeline comes at a time when New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is also pushing a plan to import more hydro-electric power from Quebec.

Canada is already the biggest foreign supplier of energy to the US. And across the political spectrum, American leaders see Canada as a safer alternative to energy suppliers in the Middle East and Central America.

But there are growing questions about the environmental costs to Canada's energy boom and the debate is causing some Canadians to rethink their country's image as one of the world's most environmentally friendly societies. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Author and activist Bill McKibben. Source: 350.org
Author and activist Bill McKibben. Source: 350.org

McKibben sees losses, victories in climate change fight

It's been a big year for author and climate change activist Bill McKibben. His organization, 350.org, led a series of national protests against an oil pipeline from Canada known as Keystone XL.

Critics say the pipeline would accelerate carbon pollution. Last month, President Barack Obama rejected the project, sparking a fierce debate in Congress.

McKibben divides his time between North Creek in the Adirondacks and Ripton, Vermont. He sat down this week to talk in-depth with Brian Mann about the debate over global warming.

McKibben says this year's flooding and the unseasonably warm winter are symptoms of big changes that are already underway.  Go to full article
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?

Is American nature writing still relevant in the age of blogs and climate change?

There was a time not so long ago when nature writers shaped the national debate.

Books and articles by authors like Rachel Carson and Bob Marshall helped build popular support for conservation, environmental laws, and creation of the national parks.

But in the age of oil spills and climate change, some of the country's top nature writers wonder whether their work can still make a difference.

Brian Mann attended a conference of writers earlier this month and has our story.  Go to full article
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?

Is American nature writing still relevant in the age of blogs and climate change?

There was a time not so long ago when nature writers shaped the national debate.

Books and articles by authors like Rachel Carson and Bob Marshall helped build popular support for conservation, environmental laws, and creation of the national parks.

But in the age of oil spills and climate change, some of the country's top nature writers wonder whether their work can still make a difference.

Brian Mann attended a conference of writers earlier this month and has our story.  Go to full article
Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org
Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org

McKibben: Climate change impacts hitting hard now

Vermont author and activist Bill McKibben just returned from a trip to India. He was meeting with environmental groups and government officials to promote a new initiative called 350.org. The organization aims to reduce the amount of carbon being pumped into the atmosphere. Scientists say CO2 particles have already risen to dangerous levels, just below 390 parts per million. McKibben wants governments, industries and private citizens to bring that level down below 350 parts per million. He spoke about the effort on Saturday in Newcomb, at the annual meeting of the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  Go to full article
Bill McKibben (Photo:  Nancie Battaglia)
Bill McKibben (Photo: Nancie Battaglia)

A Fresh Start on the Environment: "There's no more going down the road we're on"

This week, we're airing a series of interviews called "A Fresh Start." We've asked some of the country's most compelling thinkers to make recommendations for president-elect Barack Obama. One of the big questions that will face the new administration is the environment and climate change. Back in 1989, author and activist Bill McKibben wrote The End of Nature, one of the first major books about global warming. McKibben spends part of each year in Johnsburg, in the Adirondacks. But he met with Brian Mann yesterday on a suburban street in Rutland, Vermont. With automobiles chugging past and a hailstorm sweeping over the Green Mountains, McKibben said Obama's election offers a chance for real action.  Go to full article

McKibben leads national climate change rally

A Vermont activist has sparked a national protest over global warming set for this Saturday, with more than 1300 events planned in all 50 states. Late last summer, environmentalist and writer Bill McKibben helped lead a five-day walk across Vermont to demand action on global warming. On Saturday, thousands are expected to take part in rallies to demand that Congress enact curbs on carbon emissions that would cut global warming pollution 80% by 2050. The campaign, organized by McKibben and some of his students at Middlebury College, has won widespread support from a wide variety of environmental, student, and religious groups. McKibben told Todd Moe that Saturday's event will be the largest grassroots environmental protest since Earth Day 1970.  Go to full article

Vermont walk highlights global warming

More than 600 people walked into Burlington yesterday in what organizers said was the country's largest global warming demonstration yet. Marchers are calling for political action to address global warming. Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Vermont walk promotes global warming solutions

Vermonters have organized a five-day walk from Ripton to Burlington this Labor Day weekend to call attention to global climate change. The walk culminates Monday afternoon with a gathering on Burlington's Battery Park. Todd Moe talks with noted author Bill McKibben, one of the organizers of this weekend's walk, about promoting dialogue and action on behalf of a clean energy future.  Go to full article

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