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News stories tagged with "logging"

Instructors Brett McLeod and Bob Brhel teach the students how to saw down a tree. Photo: David Sommerstein
Instructors Brett McLeod and Bob Brhel teach the students how to saw down a tree. Photo: David Sommerstein

Summer school, lumberjack style

The Adirondack woodsman is a North Country archetype - brawny, independent, deeply versed in the ways of the North Woods. There are still loggers working in the forests of the Adirondacks and Tug Hill Plateau, though most are aided by chain saws and huge machinery today.

At Paul Smiths College, a summer school program is keeping the skills and ethos of the Adirondack woodsman alive. The program's 5th year starts next month.  Go to full article
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb.  Photo: Paul Hai
Galen Halasz, a young loon fan at the 2013 Loons and Logs Day in Newcomb. Photo: Paul Hai

Newcomb season starts with loons and logs on Saturday

The Adirondack Interpretive Center in Newcomb kicks off the summer season with its third rubber loon race on Saturday. It's an opportunity to get outside, rain or shine, and connect with nature. Other activities will include a bird walk, a presentation on "plein air" art by Artist-in-Residence Frances Gaffney, and Windy Baker will lead an Adirondack chair building workshop.

The art and outdoors events will be the centerpiece activities of the Visitor Center's annual Loons and Logs Day, celebrating the AIC's third year of operation as part of the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry's Newcomb Campus.

The day's events will focus on the two most iconic symbols of human and natural history in the Adirondacks: logs and loons. Some 500 black-and-white rubber loons will be dropped into the Rich Lake outlet for a 425-yard floating race. Prizes will be awarded for those who sponsored the winners. Todd Moe spoke with Visitor's Center program coordinator Paul Hai.  Go to full article
Brian Miller and Randy Gosa, from their cd <i>The Falling of the Pine</i>.  Photo:  Brian Miller
Brian Miller and Randy Gosa, from their cd The Falling of the Pine. Photo: Brian Miller

How traditional tunes connect the northeast to the midwest

A musician and folklorist from Minnesota is researching lumber camp songs and traditional music from Maine, throughout the North Country and to the north woods of the midwest.

Brian Miller grew up in the logging town of Bemidji, Minnesota. "In the shadow of the Paul Bunyan statue," he says. His research into 19th century lumber camp and Irish-American music has included singer Michael Dean, who was born and raised in St. Lawrence County.

Miller recently uncovered some of Dean's recordings (made back in the 1920s at Dean's sister's home in Canton) in the Library of Congress archives. The recordings had been lost for decades.

Todd Moe spoke with Miller about how these lost-and-found traditional songs can connect history, culture and regions.  Go to full article

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Log rolling at the annual Tupper Lake event.  Photo: Tupper Lake Woodsmen's Association
Log rolling at the annual Tupper Lake event. Photo: Tupper Lake Woodsmen's Association

Tupper Lake celebrates 30 years of "Woodsmen's Days"

This weekend marks the 30th anniversary of the Tupper Lake Woodsmen's Days. Todd Moe talks with co-organizer Shawn Augustus about Tupper Lake's celebration of logging and the timber industry.  Go to full article
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives

Clearcut logging plan sparks blistering APA debate

A plan by the Adirondack Park Agency to streamline permit applications for large-scale clearcut logging sparked fierce debate yesterday.

Supporters of the plan say it will encourage loggers and landowners to adopt better harvesting practices. At the APA's monthly meeting in Ray Brook, some commissioners spoke passionately in favor of the change.

But others expressed deep skepticism about the plan.  Go to full article
Protect the Adirondacks argues that too much clearcutting is already going on without enough monitoring by state officials. This image, posted by Protect on the group's website, was taken from the Bing mapping system.
Protect the Adirondacks argues that too much clearcutting is already going on without enough monitoring by state officials. This image, posted by Protect on the group's website, was taken from the Bing mapping system.

APA backs off controversial clear-cut logging rule

The Adirondack Park Agency is delaying action on a controversial plan to revise clearcut logging rules in the park.

The change would have affected about 700,000 acres of private timberland owned by large companies and property owners.

The logging industry strongly supported the measure, as did many academic foresters, but a coalition of green groups rallied to oppose it.  Go to full article
Mose Ginsberg
Mose Ginsberg

Adirondack Attic: from peddler to Tupper Lake civic leader

We continue our series, the Adirondack Attic, with Andy Flynn. You may know Andy from his series of Adirondack Attic books on local history. He uses the objects people make, use and leave behind to tell stories about the life and times of the region. NCPR is collaborating with Andy and his sources at the Adirondack Museum and other historical associations and museums in the region to bring these stories to air.

Today, we'll listen to a 1969 interview with Tupper Lake business pioneer Mose Ginsberg, who immigrated to the Adirondacks in the 1890's as a teenager.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)

NY to shape public use of new Adirondack park land

State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year.

Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year. Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. Supporters say these lands will open popular new areas for hiking, paddling, hunting and fishing.

The process is now underway to determine the kind of rules and guidelines that will shape public access, and state officials say they hope to avoid the kind of clashes that have marked past land classification efforts.  Go to full article
<i>The Railroad</i> is the second novel in Holtzman's <i>Adirondack Trilogy</i>.
The Railroad is the second novel in Holtzman's Adirondack Trilogy.

Books: "Adirondack Trilogy" series

A long-time Adirondack summer resident is finishing up the third book in a series of novels about the history of the region. Tony Holtzman will talk about his Adirondack Trilogy at the Northwoods Inn in Lake Placid on Thursday night at 7 pm. Holtzman first visited the Adirondacks in the early 1950's, and after retiring from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 2002, he bought a cottage at the Bartlett Carry Club on Upper Saranac Lake.

Holtzman's first novel in the trilogy, Axton Landing, was published last year. His second book in the series, The Railroad, was released earlier this summer. The trilogy portrays life in the Adirondacks in the late 19th century and tackles topics such as the environment, land use, logging, railroads and tourism--topics that are still important today.

Todd Moe spoke with Holtzman about his novels and his love of the Adirondack Park.  Go to full article

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