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News stories tagged with "guatemala"

Farmers on the Wrong Side of the Law

Over the last five years, the number of Mexican and Central Americans working on the North Country's dairy farms has risen dramatically. Industry leaders agree farms depend on reliable, plentiful Hispanic labor to survive. If national estimates are right, about three-quarters of these workers entered the United States illegally. Farmers are not required to prove their workers are legal. In fact, they can be sued for discrimination if they challenge them. Still, dairy farmers find themselves on the wrong side of immigration law as it now stands. David Sommerstein has part two of our series, Latinos on the Farm.  Go to full article

Web Only: Farmworker Legal Services of NY

Listen to David Sommerstein's interview with Jim Schmidt, co-director of Farmworker Legal Services of New York, based in Rochester. He talks about the common abuses Hispanic migrant farmworkers face in New York.  Go to full article

Latinos on the Farm, in the Shadows

In the North Country, two groups are watching the immigration debate closely: dairy farmers and the Mexicans and Central Americans who work for them. There are no numbers on exactly how many Hispanics work on dairy farms in northern New York. One estimate says 300 work in Jefferson County alone. Based on national estimates, three-quarters of them entered the United States illegally. In the first of a two part series, David Sommerstein reports on the farmhands themselves. They live largely invisible lives, inextricably linked to the farmer who hired them.  Go to full article

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