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News stories tagged with "fungi"

Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.
Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.

Natural Selections: What is a plant?

Mushrooms grow out of the soil like plants, but are fungi. Lichens may look leafy, but they are symbiotic colonies of fungi and algae. Seaweed looks like a plant, but is an algae colony. And Indian Pipe looks like a fungi, but is a plant. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss the ins and outs of botany.  Go to full article
Paul Smiths student Brooks Worden earned the nickname "The Mushroom Man" during the hunt.
Paul Smiths student Brooks Worden earned the nickname "The Mushroom Man" during the hunt.

Into the woods for morel mania

Those who love edible wild mushrooms, cousins of the grocery store variety, also enjoy the annual spring hunt for one of the most elusive -- the morel. May is morel month in the North Country.

Todd Moe joined an outing of mushroom collectors at Paul Smiths College last spring. The group held a friendly contest to see who could find and pick the largest quantity of morels. By the end of the hunt it was clear you don't have to have to go out looking for morels with a meal in mind. Just learning to identify each mycological species is a challenge.

A reminder about looking for edible mushrooms: even distinctive yellow morels have look-a-likes that are poisonous. The slightest doubt about a mushroom is warning enough not to eat it.  Go to full article
Wild morels, a spring treasure.
Wild morels, a spring treasure.

Stalking the elusive morel

This is the season when morels are hunted by thousands of people simply for their taste and the joy of the hunt. They're another sign of spring in the North Country. Mushroom hunters say their favorite fungi are popping up earlier than usual this year. Todd Moe has caught morel fever every spring since he was a child, and heads into his own back woods to look for these "aristocrats" of the forest.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Trees and Fungus

When beavers flood an area, the trees die off. After they leave, why don't the trees come back? As Dr. Curt Stager explains, the flooding kills off a fungus crucial to the growth of spruce. The trees can't return until voles or other vectors reinfect the soil. This and more on trees and fungus with host Martha Foley.  Go to full article

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