Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "fashion"

Lionesses love the mane. . . Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/digitalart/3240381175/">Art G</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Lionesses love the mane. . . Photo: Art G, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Lion Manes

Why would a heavy fur cape, like a lion's mane, be appropriate on a tropical savanna?

As with male fashion in humans, it appears the that the lionesses of the Serengeti like it--the thicker and darker, the better. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk hair.  Go to full article
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull are organizing a Civil War fashion show in Massena on Saturday.
Betty Dochstader and Maria Hull are organizing a Civil War fashion show in Massena on Saturday.

Serious about Civil War fashion: don't call them costumes

Civil War re-enactors from around the region will gather at Robert Moses State Park in Massena this weekend. But it isn't all cannons and uniforms. The many layers of a 19th century woman will be revealed as part of a fashion show on Saturday afternoon.

Todd Moe spoke with Maria Hull during last summer's annual Civil War Reenactment Weekend. She's a technology teacher in the Hudson Valley, who is also a Civil War re-enactor. Women's fashions from that era were all about making the waist appear small. Hull says hoop skirts, petticoats and full sleeves helped. She studied theater arts in college, makes her own Civil War era dresses and is an expert on women's fashions from the 1860s.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Women's Clothing Swap

They say fashion is cyclical. On today's Heard Up North, Tasha Haverty takes us to one of the North Country's most glamorous evenings of the year: the semi-annual Women's Clothing Swap at the Canton Free Library.  Go to full article
Karina White of Akwesasne models a traditional outfit, designed by Niio Perkins.  Photos by Randi Rourke Barreiro
Karina White of Akwesasne models a traditional outfit, designed by Niio Perkins. Photos by Randi Rourke Barreiro

Native fashion adorns runway in Akwesasne

Four years ago, a tobacco company in Akwesasne, Jacobs Manufacturing, started a native fashion show to raise money for the local hat and mitten fund.

The "Nations Best Next Top Model Show" has grown into a big attraction. More than a thousand fans filled the Jacobs plant on the St. Regis Mohawk reservation last Saturday night. Grammy-award winner Joanne Shenandoah performed.

Models from Iroquois communities showed off the work of ten Mohawk designers. The fashions included traditional regalia, cocktail and casual wear, and furs.

Joni Sarah White, an Akwesasne artist, joined models and designers at last weekend's Nations Best Next Top Models Show in Akwesasne. Winning model Chatnie Herne won a one-year contract with an Ottawa modeling agency.
Producer Randi Rourke Barreiro was backstage and by the runway for today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Edwina Sutherland and some of her dolls.
Edwina Sutherland and some of her dolls.

Dressing the part for history

Clothing has always been a product of time and place. Thanks to various sources, experts know a lot about who wore what, and when. Information that comes in handy these days for plays, museums and re-enactment projects. The village of Manotick, Ontario marks its 150th anniversary this year. Events planned for the coming year will sometimes feature volunteers in period costumes. To help participants look the part, Edwina Sutherland, of Edwina Richards Studio, is presenting a lecture tomorrow on fashions of the mid-to-late 1800s, followed by a workshop on period dressing on February 7. She spoke with Ottawa correspondent Lucy Martin about clothing in centuries past, and the craft of sewing and replicating what people wore.  Go to full article
Students hit the fashion runway in Heuvelton
Students hit the fashion runway in Heuvelton

From trash to fashion in Heuvelton

Earlier this month the Heuvelton Central School Art Club held its fourth annual Wearable Art Show. It was a fashion program that featured clothing from found or recycled materials. Trophies were awarded for "most original", "best use of materials" and "most sophisticated". Heuvelton art teacher Sally Hartman and some of her students told Todd Moe they worked for weeks on their fashion creations. Styrofoam packing peanuts, plastic shopping bags, soda bottles and tin can lids were transformed into dresses, shirts, pants and jewelry. This was an opportunity to make something wonderful from things that are left over or thrown away.  Go to full article

1-6 of 6