Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "farms"

Books: "Finding my Way to Moose River Farm"

Anne Phinney lives on a farm near Old Forge and has loved animals all her life. She's a teacher, writer and farmer who has written a new book about life among the animals -- 11 horses, 4 dogs, 3 goats, 2 donkeys, an iguana and pot belly pig -- on Moose River Farm. Todd Moe talks with Phinney about her book, Finding My Way to Moose River Farm.  Go to full article
Green Party candidate Donald Hassig. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Green Party candidate Donald Hassig. Photo: Natasha Haverty

NY21 Green Party candidate: deport foreign farm workers

The candidates in the race for New York's 21st District Congressional seat gathered Thursday night for a forum in Wanakena. At that forum, Green Party candidate Donald Hassig called for foreign workers on farms in the North Country to be rounded up and deported.

Hassig blasted plans put forward by the Democratic and Republican candidates to allow more laborers to work legally on dairy farms and apple orchards.  Go to full article
Three of the goats at Cross Island Farms. Photo: Cross Island Farms
Three of the goats at Cross Island Farms. Photo: Cross Island Farms

Local farmers open their gardens, barns for tours

It's harvest season, and nearly two dozen farmers and farm businesses in Jefferson County are opening their doors to the public this weekend. Livestock, vegetable farms, wineries and retailers specializing in locally produced goods are participating in the 2012 Harvest Tour Weekend on Saturday and Sunday.

Dani Baker, co-owner of Cross Island Farms on Wellesley Island, is one of the co-organizers of the Tour and her farm is open to visitors, too. She said it should be a great opportunity to make connections with area farmers.  Go to full article
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms
Critics say the Department of Labor "scrubbed" its website of documents about child safety on farms

Critics say farm safety rules scrapped because of election year politics

The Obama administration has scrapped an effort to introduce new safety regulations designed to protect the tens of thousands of kids who work in agriculture.

Many farmers are applauding the decision to shelve the rules, calling it a victory for their rural way of life.

But safety experts say more teenagers under the age of 16 die each year working on farms than in all other industries combined.

With the presidential election just six months away, supporters and critics alike say the new rules were just too controversial. North Country Public Radio's Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
Photo: NYS Dept. of Health
Photo: NYS Dept. of Health

Labor department scraps youth farmworker regs

The US Labor Department has scrapped safety regulations designed to protect teenagers working on farms.

North Country Congressman Bill Owens worked hard to pressure the Obama administration to withdraw the rules.  Go to full article
New York state Health Officials say this sileage defacer killed an 18-year-old farm worker in a work accident in 2005 (Photo:  NYS Department of Health)
New York state Health Officials say this sileage defacer killed an 18-year-old farm worker in a work accident in 2005 (Photo: NYS Department of Health)

War of words escalates over farm safety for kids

Farmers and members of Congress are pushing back hard against a plan by the Obama administration's to impose new safety rules on farms that employ children.

Critics say the proposed regulations would limit the ability of farm families to employ their own kids and could threaten a traditional way of life in rural America.

But supporters of the new rules say far too many teenagers are suffering serious injuries or dying on farms.

And they say many of the teenagers who work on farms in the US are hourly workers, with no family ties to the farmers who hire them.

As Brian Mann reports, this is a political fight that could reshape the way Americans think about farms and farm work.  Go to full article
Figure 1.6a Projected change in annual temperature for the 2080s in the Northeast relative to the 1980s baseline period. (NYSERDA Report)
Figure 1.6a Projected change in annual temperature for the 2080s in the Northeast relative to the 1980s baseline period. (NYSERDA Report)

Climate report predicts changes for northern NY farms

One of the lead investigators of the recent report on climate change in New York says the heavy storms this spring and summer, and the mild temperatures this fall will not necessarily be the "new normal" for the north country and Adirondacks. But Cornell University climate researcher Arthur DeGaetano says the heavy rainfall and warm weather could be a glimpse into the future.

The report, released late last month by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is based on the work of more than 50 scientists. It paints a harsh picture of extreme climate events - predicting that upstate New York will have heavier, and more frequent downpours, like those we've seen this year.

The report says the temperature in New York has already warmed 2.4 degrees in the past forty years. It projects a further rise of as much as three degrees by the 2020s, with the temperature steadily warming as much as nine degrees by the 2080s.

DeGaetano says that means northern New York would have a climate more like North Carolina or Georgia. He says the report isn't meant to scare people. It's meant to help them transition along with the climate. DeGaetano says agriculture will be one of the industries most affected. He spoke with Julie Grant.  Go to full article
Ravaged crops at Rivermede Farm (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Ravaged crops at Rivermede Farm (Photo: Brian Mann)

Irene's damage to Upstate farms "numbing"

Farmers and state officials are still trying to sort out just how big the hit from hurricane Irene will be. Many small-scale organic farmers in Upstate New York lost vegetable crops during the storm and the flooding that followed.

But an even bigger blow could be felt by the dairy and beef industries. They lost their feed crops of corn and hay just as we head into the winter. Brian Mann has this update.  Go to full article

Flavor Fest at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake

If you're interested in eating locally, the folks at the Wild Center in Tupper Lake are setting up a feast of information and food today. Stefanie Ratcliffe is director of the Wild Center. She says they hold a farmer's market every Thursday, but they wanted to do more to help people find ways to eat locally and to find local food and beer producers.  Go to full article
We'll just have to wait and see how it plays out...whether we make it up the rest of the year or not is questionable.

Farmers struggle to catch up after a month of floods

The economic effects of the flooding that began in late April are still being felt by many in the north country--the rains have left homes and communities heavily damaged; tourism dollars have been lost.

And after more than a month of exceptionally wet weather, area farmers are saying they may not be able to catch up with the planting they need to do for the fall harvest. Fields have been too wet in many cases to plant corn, or to harvest grass for hay--and it's getting down to the wire.  Go to full article

1-10 of 37  next 10 »  last »