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The Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. Photo: David Sommerstein

Steroids cloud Cooperstown ceremony

Doping cast a shadow over the festivities at the Baseball Hall of Fame's annual induction ceremony yesterday in Cooperstown, near Utica.

Without the stain of steroid suspicions, slugger Barry Bonds and pitcher Rogers Clemens would likely have been enshrined. But due in large part to the steroid era, baseball writers didn't vote a single player into the Hall this year.

Cinncinati Reds hall of Famer and broadcaster Joe Morgan said the mood in Cooperstown was toned down this weekend. Morgan told CBS Sports "there's not as much excitement on Main Street as there usually is." Thirty-four Hall of Famers were on hand instead of the typical 40 or 50.

Three men were inducted posthumously into the Hall yesterday - umpire Hank O'Day, 1880s player Deacon White, and former New York Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert.

Also, former major league pitcher Tommy John was on hand, appropriately enough, as Dr. Frank Jobe was honored at the ceremony. Jobe was recognized for his impact on the sport for developing the procedure known as Tommy John surgery when he fixed the left-hander's elbow in 1974.  Go to full article
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY

A century later, an African American baseball hero gets his due

This weekend, the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, near Utica, is holding its annual induction ceremony. It's the sport's greatest honor to be enshrined in the Hall.

One Upstate New York baseball legend is not in the Hall. Most people don't know his name, even though he owns an historic distinction.

In 1878, John Jackson - aka Bud Fowler - became the first African American to play professional baseball with white men. His career spanned more than 30 years as a player, manager and entrepreneur.

Fowler grew up in Cooperstown. Last spring, the town recognized his story of perseverance in the face of bigotry. David Sommerstein was there and has our story.  Go to full article
Cooperstown's Main Street is fearing thin crowds at this year's induction ceremony. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Cooperstown's Main Street is fearing thin crowds at this year's induction ceremony. Photo: David Sommerstein.

'Steroids Era' leaves Cooperstown without its biggest baseball draw

This Sunday, baseball will hold one of its most sacred and enduring rituals. Three men will be forever enshrined in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, south of Utica.

The problem is none of them are alive.

For the first time since 1996, not one living player got the 75% of baseball writers' votes needed to gain entry to the Hall. Many interpreted the result as a collective protest vote over the steroids era.

Induction weekend is huge for the village that lives and breathes baseball, and for its region's economy. Now, people are trying to make the best of an uncomfortable moment in baseball history.  Go to full article
A miner in the dangerous below-ground world of Lyon Mountain (Source:  Lawrence P. Gooley)
A miner in the dangerous below-ground world of Lyon Mountain (Source: Lawrence P. Gooley)

The hard, rich iron years of Lyon Mountain

The Clinton County village of Lyon Mountain is a community that's trying to find its future. The state correctional facility closed down two years ago and the buildings go up for auction in July.

This isn't the first time Lyon Mountain has had to reinvent itself. In 1967, the iron mine that drove early prosperity closed its doors for good. The proud company town has struggled ever since.

Lyon Mountain's iron mining era still shapes the memories and local mythology in that part of the North Country.  Go to full article
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY
Bud Fowler as a member of the 1885 Keokuk, Iowa, baseball team. Photo courtesy the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY

A century later, African-American baseball hero gets his due

Jackie Robinson is getting the big time Hollywood treatment with the new blockbuster "42". Meanwhile, a much lesser known African American baseball hero is getting his due in the cradle of baseball history.

In 1878, John Jackson - aka Bud Fowler - became the first African-American to play professional baseball with white men. His career spanned more than 30 years as a player, manager and entrepreneur.

Fowler grew up in Cooperstown, NY, the home of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Last weekend, the town recognized his story of perseverance in the face of bigotry.  Go to full article
This baseball uniform breastplate was originally owned by Charles Henry Bailey, a miner who was a charter member of the Lyon Mountain Baseball Club in 1877. The breastplate was made by his mother, who owned a boarding house in Lyon Mountain. It is now in the collection of the Adirondack Museum.  Photo: Adk Museum
This baseball uniform breastplate was originally owned by Charles Henry Bailey, a miner who was a charter member of the Lyon Mountain Baseball Club in 1877. The breastplate was made by his mother, who owned a boarding house in Lyon Mountain. It is now in the collection of the Adirondack Museum. Photo: Adk Museum

Adirondack Attic: an heirloom from baseball's early days

Just in time for the start of baseball season, Andy Flynn visits the Adirondack Museum for a look at a baseball uniform from the 1870's.  Go to full article

Watertown Wizards baseball team is for sale

The Watertown Wizards summer collegiate baseball team may be leaving Watertown. The owner has put the team up for sale, and he blames the city for his decision. Joanna Richards has the story.  Go to full article
Moriah celebrates "Johnn Podres Day" (Photos:  Brian Mann, NCPR)
Moriah celebrates "Johnn Podres Day" (Photos: Brian Mann, NCPR)

Moriah remembers "hometown hero" Johnny Podres

Over the weekend, the town of Moriah held its first-ever "Johnny Podres Day." Local fans celebrated the life of the legendary pitcher, who grew up in the Adirondack foothills in the 1940s and 50s. Podres went on to lead the Brooklyn Dodgers to their victory over the New York Yankees in the 1955 World Series.

On Saturday, a temporary museum opened on the main street of Port Henry. It was filled with memorabilia collected by Pat Salerno. He's a mason and a contractor who grew up in Moriah during Podres's heyday in major league baseball. Brian Mann took a tour of the exhibit with Pat Salerno and sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

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