Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: Todd Moe

Morning Host and Producer
A native of rural Minnesota, Todd Moe grew up on a farm not far from mythical Lake Wobegon. He attended St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN; studied Speech/Theatre and Norwegian, and began his radio career as a student announcer at WCAL (2002 marks its 80th anniversary!).

Moe sings in the Potsdam Community Chorus, and hobbies include food, gardening, history and tango! He was a newscaster and reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for eight years. A favorite memory from that job was interviewing Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann. Moe and his partner, Paul Siskind, moved to the North Country in 1998. Siskind teaches at the Crane School of Music. E-mail

Stories filed by Todd Moe

Show             
This inmate drawing on a prison envelope is part of the "Cellblock Visions" exhibit on display at SLU's Brush Art Gallery through mid-April. Photo courtesy Phyllis Kornfeld
This inmate drawing on a prison envelope is part of the "Cellblock Visions" exhibit on display at SLU's Brush Art Gallery through mid-April. Photo courtesy Phyllis Kornfeld

In Canton, "Cellblock Visions" shows off prison inmates' art

There's an alternative art world flourishing in American prisons. "Cellblock Visions," an exhibit at the Brush Art Gallery at St. Lawrence University this spring, features artwork by inmates from county jails to death row. Curator Phyllis Kornfeld, who has taught art courses in the prison system for more than 30 years, will give a lecture on the exhibit in Griffiths Arts Center, room 123, Tuesday at 7pm.

Todd Moe spoke with Kornfeld, who began her career teaching art in prisons in Oklahoma in 1983 (hear that interview by clicking "listen" above, or read the transcription below.) Today, she works at prisons in Massachusetts. She says even after 30 years, she finds the art created behind bars to be "fresh and amazing". Kornfeld says men and women inmates, having no previous training, turn to art for a sense of self-respect, respect for others and a way to find peace.

View pictures from the exhibit below.  Go to full article
The Currys will showcase music from their new album, <i>Follow</i>, with a free concert Saturday night (7 pm) in SUNY Potsdam's Snell Music Theatre.  Photo:  The Currys
The Currys will showcase music from their new album, Follow, with a free concert Saturday night (7 pm) in SUNY Potsdam's Snell Music Theatre. Photo: The Currys

The Currys return to Potsdam for homegrown folk rock concert

The Currys: two brothers, one cousin and all musicians. The alternative folk group is releasing its first full length album this spring, and returns to Potsdam for a concert in Snell Music Theatre on Saturday night.

Highlights over the last couple of years include a tour of Ireland, a music video and lots of new music. Todd Moe spoke with Galen Curry by phone as the muscians -- including Jimmy Curry, Tommy Curry, Johnny Humphreys and Matt Kauper -- made their way east through the Rockies on their way to the North Country.  Go to full article
"Carried," by Kris Rozelle
"Carried," by Kris Rozelle

Pictures: In Potsdam, an exhibit of mixed-media art

There's new art on display at the St. Lawrence County Arts Council's Gallery at Town Hall in Potsdam. The show merges the collage-like work by two area artists: Cheryl Mirer and Kris Rozelle. The exhibit officially opens tomorrow night (details) and runs until April 23.  Go to full article
The cast of "The Foreigner" rehearses a scene at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek.  Photo: Our Town Theatre Group
The cast of "The Foreigner" rehearses a scene at the Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek. Photo: Our Town Theatre Group

Preview: "The Foreigner" in North Creek

Our Town Theatre Group opens its spring production of "The Foreigner" Friday night at 7:30 at Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek. The comedy, by Larry Shue, is set at a fishing lodge in rural Georgia. Todd Moe spoke with director Jordan Hornstein, who also plays the part of "Froggy" LeSeuer in the show, about its traditional comic motifs.  Go to full article
Dr. Stephen Ledoux. Photo via <a href="http://www.canton.edu/news/index.php/2014/03/ledoux14/">SUNY Canton</a>
Dr. Stephen Ledoux. Photo via SUNY Canton

What's behaviorology and how can it help solve global problems?

SUNY Canton's Sustainability Lecture Series continues tonight with a talk about using behaviorology, the study of natural science explanations of behavior, to face global challenges like climate change and overpopulation. Stephen Ledoux is Professor of Behaviorology at SUNY-Canton and has written a new book, "Running Out of Time: Introducing Behaviorology to Help Solve Global Problems." He spoke with Todd Moe about the benefits of expanding the "roundtable" of natural sciences to include behaviorology.  Go to full article
Photo via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153850682500702&set=a.10151455321020702.832469.566575701&type=1&theater">Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook</a>, used with permission
Photo via Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook, used with permission

Tree-saving clarinetists bring mission to Saranac Lake

This evening, a quartet on a mission will play the BluSeed Studios in Saranac Lake. C4C Quartet will raise money for Clarinets for Conservation, an organization clarinetist Michele Von Haugg founded with a goal to save the African Blackwood Tree, or 'Mpingo, in Tanzania. The wood is used to make musical instruments including the clarinet.

Over a the last few years, Von Haugg and other clarinetists have raised money to travel to Africa to teach music and plant hundreds of trees. She told Todd Moe that the students learn about sustainability, and that learning music benefits kids in much broader ways, too.  Go to full article
Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark
Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher coming home from Antarctica

With the continuing cold weather here in the North Country, it might feel like we're in Antarctica, but Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has one on us in that regard. Clark returns to the North Country later this week after nearly two months in the real Antarctica; he was one of 17 teachers selected from across the country to work with the Arctic Research Consortium's PolarTREC program, studying climate change.

Clark lived and worked aboard the RV Palmer, an ice breaker research vessel near the Totten Glacier System on the eastern Antarctica coast, one of the most remote, uncharted regions of the world.

He's journaled about his experiences online, and spoken by phone with his students throughout the trip. Todd Moe caught up with him via satellite phone as the ship was heading north and he was packing up for the return trip (listen here.)  Go to full article
Traveling John returns to Sweden next month to complete his first solo album, after traveling around America.  He spent nearly 10 years with one of Sweden's biggest pop bands.  Photo courtesy John Dunsö
Traveling John returns to Sweden next month to complete his first solo album, after traveling around America. He spent nearly 10 years with one of Sweden's biggest pop bands. Photo courtesy John Dunsö

North Country is an inspiration for Swedish pop singer John Dunsö

Like a lot of Europeans, Swedish pop singer John Dunsö says he's amazed at the immensity of the American landscape. Dunsö visited the west coast last year and is living and writing new music during an artist residency in the North Country this month. He is the resident artist at Better Farm, a 65-acre sustainability campus in Redwood, NY.

Dunsö is the former guitarist in one of Sweden's biggest indie-pop bands, Billie the Vision and the Dancers. Now, he's recording his first solo album based on his travels across North and South America the last few years. "Rerun", one of the songs on his new album, is already a hit in his native Sweden.

Also known as Traveling John, Dunsö spoke with Todd Moe about how open space, physical work, solitude and big sandwiches help the creative process.  Go to full article

Listen: New Adirondack Treasure novel sets mystery, adventure on St. Lawrence

Cranberry Lake author Matthew Glavin loves a good mystery and a hunt for lost treasure. He and co-author Michael Dolan have released the second installment in the "Adirondack Treasure" series. This second novel, "Isle Royale", features a legendary treasure buried on an island in the St. Lawrence River during the French and Indian War, and terrorists who have smuggled a missile, with a super-EMT warhead, aboard a ship on the river.

Glavin told Todd Moe that he grew up in Syracuse, moved to the Adirondacks about four years ago, and has focused on local history and writing fiction.  Go to full article
Garden crop rotation can maintian soil fertility, reduce disease and increase yields. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/57217144@N00/476016841/">Annie and John</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Garden crop rotation can maintian soil fertility, reduce disease and increase yields. Photo: Annie and John, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Why rotate crops in your backyard garden?

Just like big farms, the backyard garden can benefit from rotating vegetable crops. Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulturist Amy Ivy says small-scale crop rotation can minimize pests and disease and increase yields. Todd Moe spoke with Amy about deciding which crops to plant in the vegetable garden from one year to the next. She says a knowledge of vegetables and their botanical families is helpful.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   11-20 of 1959 stories   next 10 »   last »