Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

Show             
On a humid August day, the view of Mineville's old iron works from Cheney Mountain. Photo: Brian Mann
On a humid August day, the view of Mineville's old iron works from Cheney Mountain. Photo: Brian Mann

Ramble up Cheney Mountain and a view of history

It's been a brilliant summer for hiking, with long days often bringing mild temperatures. This week, Brian Mann and his wife Susan Waters set off for a ramble up Cheney Mountain in the Champlain Valley hamlet of Mineville.  Go to full article
Ice storm, December 2013. Photo by Mark Kurtz
Ice storm, December 2013. Photo by Mark Kurtz

Autopsy for a brutal winter season

It's hard to remember on a beautiful summer morning like this one, but last winter was long and grueling here in the North Country.

There was a ferocious ice storm in December and stretches of brutal cold that continued late into the spring. A lot of those road crews out on the highways this month are still repairing potholes and frost heaves caused by record-low temperatures.

The thing is, that's not what scientists were expecting. Weather models going into the winter predicted a fairly normal, or even a mild season. Meteorologists way the culprit was a dramatic shift in the big air currents that flow across North America.  Go to full article
The El Nino in 1997 as imaged by NASA.  Photo:  NASA, JPL
The El Nino in 1997 as imaged by NASA. Photo: NASA, JPL

How wintry will this winter be? Get your first forecast

As we head into the second week of August, it may seem a little too soon to start thinking about winter and the weather it may bring.

But the National Weather service is already developing early models designed to give some sense of snow and temperature conditions.

The very, very long-term forecast for this winter is for moderate to light snow and warm-ups that could mean a lighter snow pack in the Adirondacks and the Green Mountains.  Go to full article
Victory signs have been posted by supporters of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake since the July court ruling that validated the resort's permits.  But the legal fight may not be over.  Photo:  Brian Mann
Victory signs have been posted by supporters of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake since the July court ruling that validated the resort's permits. But the legal fight may not be over. Photo: Brian Mann

Activists appeal Big Tupper resort court decision

Two environmental groups and "a neighboring landowner" in Tupper Lake say they'll appeal a sweeping decision issued last month by a state court that upheld state permits for the Adirondack Club and Resort project.

In a statement issued late Monday afternoon, Protect the Adirondacks and the Sierra Club announced that they will challenge a unanimous vote by the state appellate court upholding state permits for the massive development.  Go to full article
The Minerva Central School District will now have to scramble to make deep cuts before next school year.  Photo:  Minerva Central School District
The Minerva Central School District will now have to scramble to make deep cuts before next school year. Photo: Minerva Central School District

Minerva school budget falls short for third time

For the third time, the Minerva school budget has failed to win approval with voters.

After a second re-vote yesterday, the district in the eastern Adirondacks will now be forced to adopt a sharply reduced "contingency" budget.  Go to full article
Sabrina Jones translates the history and statistics of America's era of mass incarceration into a graphic, sometimes claustrophobic story. Image: Sabrina Jones
Sabrina Jones translates the history and statistics of America's era of mass incarceration into a graphic, sometimes claustrophobic story. Image: Sabrina Jones

A graphic account of America's love affair with prisons

One of the most complicated issues to talk about, here in the North Country and across the US, is our nation's massive prison system. America incarcerates far more individuals than any other nation on earth, far outstripping countries like China and Russia. It's a thorny topic that tangles up everything from race relations to small-town economies to our ideas about justice and drug addiction.

Sabrina Jones is a political artist who spends each summer in Saratoga County and she'll speak tonight at at 7:30 pm at Bluseed Studio in Saranac Lake. Jones uses comic books to capture the complicated, painful history of America's four-decade long era of mass incarceration.  Go to full article
Anne LaBastille was a celebrated Adirondack author and activist.  She passed away in 2011.
Anne LaBastille was a celebrated Adirondack author and activist. She passed away in 2011.

LaBastille's "Woodswoman" cabin will be preserved

The Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake announced over the weekend that it will preserve the cabin built by Anne LaBastille.

LaBastille's book "Woodswoman" was published in 1976 and established her as a prominent North Country voice.

She wrote about her experiences living alone at Twitchell Lake in the western Adirondacks and about her support for conservation of wild lands in the Park.

LaBastille died in 2011 at the age of 75 after moving to Westport and then to Plattsburgh.

The Adirondack Museum now plans to bring the cabin to Blue Mountain Lake and make it a part of the museum's permanent display.  Go to full article
Cathy Dove will take over as president of Paul Smiths College September 1. Photo provided
Cathy Dove will take over as president of Paul Smiths College September 1. Photo provided

Paul Smiths College names woman as 10th president

Paul Smiths College has chosen Cathy Dove, vice president of Cornell NYC Tech in New York City, to serve as the tenth president of Paul Smith's College.

According to a statement released Monday morning, Dove will begin at the Adirondack college September 1st.

She follows John Mills, who served as president for ten years.  Go to full article
Trevor Sisto, age 20, of Fort Covington NY has been charged with numerous felonies following last week's deadly crash.  Photo:  Lake Placid Village Police Department via Lake Placid News
Trevor Sisto, age 20, of Fort Covington NY has been charged with numerous felonies following last week's deadly crash. Photo: Lake Placid Village Police Department via Lake Placid News

Police say deadly Lake Placid car chase handled properly

State Police and the Police Chief in Lake Placid say a high-speed car chase that ended in a fatal accident last week in the Adirondacks was handled properly.

The crash on Rt. 86 in Ray Brook left a Potsdam couple dead and their eleven-year-old daughter with serious injuries.

In the days since the accident, questions have circulated in social media about whether police made a mistake in pursuing Trevor Sisto, age 20, who was fleeing a hit-and-run accident in Lake Placid.  Go to full article
Major Richard Smith, commander of New York State Police Troop B in Ray Brook, spoke at a press conference Friday afternoon.  Photo:  Brian Mann
Major Richard Smith, commander of New York State Police Troop B in Ray Brook, spoke at a press conference Friday afternoon. Photo: Brian Mann

Was reckless driver in crash that killed Potsdam couple suicidal?

At a press conference Friday afternoon in Lake Placid, State Police said that 20-year-old Trevor Sisto of Fort Covington had spoken of suicide before Thursday's deadly crash.

Sisto, now in custody being held on $200,000 bail, has been charged with felony counts of unlawfully fleeing a Police Officer and driving while ability impaired by drugs.

He was also ticketed for reckless driving, failure to keep right and speeding. State police say more charges are pending.

Sisto crashed into a car in Ray Brook, New York, killing a Potsdam couple and seriously injuring their daughter.

"There has been some information shared with us relative to [SIsto] making general suicidal ideation in the not too distant pat," said Major Richard Smith, State Police commander for Troop B headquartered in Ray Brook.

Major Smith said that mind-set might have contributed to "the mindset that went into this reckless and erratic behavior.

He added that after being arrested, Sisto allegedly expressed regret that he hadn't killed any police officers during Thursday's chase.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   11-20 of 2945 stories   next 10 »   last »