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Jul 28, 2014 — In a deal that would have been unimaginable 20 years ago, Apple has announced a partnership with IBM. The two companies will work together on a new class of applications for iPads and iPhones.
Jul 28, 2014 — One-click online shopping is changing how we shop. Stores with leases as short as a day are proliferating — meaning a storefront can be a designer clothing store one day and a test kitchen the next.
Jul 28, 2014 — Social networks like Facebook and Twitter are increasingly finding ways to move into e-commerce, adding buttons and acquiring startups that encourage users to buy products on their sites. Hannah Kuchler of the Financial Times discusses the moves with Audie Cornish.
Jul 27, 2014 — The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
Jul 27, 2014 — An experiment at a new production of Carmen has many wondering how technology will affect operagoers' experience. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Kim Witman, director of the Wolf Trap Opera.
 
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Curt Stager
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Save the Carbon
Naturalist Curt Stager, co-host of Natural Selections and author of Deep Future, shares long-term perspectives on environmental change, past, present, and future.

Natural Selections: Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss

Special Reports

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Dragonflies and Damselfies
Todd Moe talks with investigators about how volunteers help study these colorful insects and their habitats. Photos by Vici & Steve Diehl.
Invasive Eurasian watermilfoil in Saratoga Lake. Photo: Janice Painter, CC some rights reserved
Invasive Eurasian watermilfoil in Saratoga Lake. Photo: Janice Painter, CC some rights reserved

Beating invasive water milfoil, year by year

New York state's first-ever Invasive Species Awareness Week is drawing to a close.

There's been a slew of public outreach and education initiatives - all to help educate the public about invasive species on land and in water, and ways to stop their spread.

One took paddlers to Upper Saranac Lake to learn about a successful and ongoing 10-year campaign to rid the lake of Eurasian watermilfoil.  Go to full article
SUNY Potsdam students use trowels and brushes to gently excavate soil and peel through layers of history along the Raquette River in Potsdam. Photo: Todd Moe

SUNY Potsdam students dig into history along the Raquette River

Student archaeologists excavating a site along the Raquette River in Potsdam have unearthed pieces of prehistoric Native American pottery, stone tools and part of a spear tip that could be 5,000 years old.

The SUNY Potsdam Anthropology Department is overseeing the summer school program on college property along the river. It allows budding young scholars the chance to get their hands dirty while learning more about uncovering buried artifacts, mapping and field research.

Todd Moe stopped by the dig site recently to watch the students search for more clues to the North Country's ancient past.  Go to full article
Susan Chan explains the specialized pollination performed by squash bees. Photo: Lucy Martin

What farmers and landowners can to to sustain bees

For years we've been hearing different reporting on a basic theme: A third of our food supply depends on bees and pollinating insects are in a serious state of decline. Most of that attention has been focused on domesticated honey bees. But there are hundreds of species of wild pollinating insects and they play key roles too.

That may be why a seminar called "Bringing back the Bees" held in Perth, Ontario last September, generated a strong response. Lucy Martin attended the day of talks, plus a field tour of a berry and vegetable farm, as experts shared simple ways to help pollinators right now.  Go to full article
Summer solstice sunset at Stonehenge. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/houseofcards/1361466718/">Alex Clark</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

In the summer night sky: Solstice, aphelion, planets and skywatching events

The Summer Solstice is this Saturday, and there's plenty to see in the summer night sky. St. Lawrence University astronomer Dr. Aileen O'Donoghue joins Todd Moe for a chat...  Go to full article
Ubu Ale: an artisan brew from Lake Placid Craft Brewing. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/sabine01/3875859563/">Tricia G.</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY announces boost for hops research, wine tasting

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York is giving sales tax exemptions for winery tastings and funding for hops and malting barley research.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Wednesday...  Go to full article
David Gallant behind the display table at the MVFN annual meeting and supper. Photo: Lucy Martin

Retired naturalists pass on knowledge to kids

In Almonte, Ontario, a local organization called Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists offers a robust array of environmental activities with year-round programming. Offerings...  Go to full article
Martha and Curt at a recent Natural Selections call-in. Photo: Dale Hobson

Listen: Natural Selections climate change call-in

Climate change is in the news, from the recent update by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and its detailed report on national and local impacts, to the news of...  Go to full article
Half the planets are visible right now--the back row (Jupiter and Saturn) and the front (Mars and Mercury). Aileen says five are visible, actually, if you just look down. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Size_planets_comparison.jpg">Lsmpascal</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Planets, planets, planets: who's up and where

St. Lawrence University physicist Aileen O'Donoghue says the planets are the big news of the night sky just now. Between Mercury (just up in the northwest), Jupiter in the...  Go to full article
A male bumblebee about to alight on an alumroot. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bumblebee_heuchera.jpg">Sjjubs</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

How bumblebees keep warm

Bees need to be warm in order to fly. That's usually not a problem, since it takes millions of round trips to flowers to make a pound of honey. But should they fall idle long...  Go to full article
The rusty blackbird may vanish from the Adirondacks. Photo: Larry Master, used with permission

Iconic Adirondack birds face sharp decline

A new study is raising alarm about the future of some of the Adirondack Park's most iconic birds. The report from the Wildlife Conservation Society's Adirondack Program found...  Go to full article

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