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Gardening
Jul 9, 2014 — If you always end up killing your house plants, this week's innovation pick may help. This new microfarming appliance grows produce indoors with just seeds, an electrical outlet and a little water.
Apr 5, 2014 — More and more city dwellers are trying their hand at urban gardening. Most know to be wary of lead in their soil, a report finds, but they're clueless about how to avoid other types of contaminants.
Dec 16, 2013 — A woman in Miami Shores, Fla., is suing her town after it forced her to remove vegetables from the garden in her front yard, which she had tended for 17 years. She's being backed by a a national public interest law firm, but the town says it's a long-standing zoning ordinance that won't be overturned.
Oct 29, 2013 — Older people who are active every day appear to lower their risk of heart disease and death by almost a third, even if they're not doing the kind of exercise that breaks a sweat. Gardening and puttering around the house qualify. And don't overlook berry-picking, a popular pastime in Sweden, where the study was done.
Jul 12, 2013 — Earlier this week we told you about people who want to see micro-gardening go big. We've chosen a few of our favorite images of micro-gardens from around the country that make the most of small spaces and idle containers.
 

Gardening Links

Amy Ivy
Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy
Garden Rant
Encyclopedic Guide to Northeastern Weed Species on CD-ROM: Cornell Weed Ecology

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Special Features

Audio Series
Local Flavors: Todd Moe keeps it homegrown in this series focused on eating locally, and on sustainable agriculture and gardening.
Diana Beresford-Kroeger, among the hellebores. Photo: Sarah Harris
Diana Beresford-Kroeger, among the hellebores. Photo: Sarah Harris

"Sacred and science go together" for botanist Diana Beresford-Kroeger

Travel half a mile down a tree-lined dirt road in southern Ontario, and you'll find an oasis, a wooden cabin surrounded by sprawling gardens. Diana Beresford-Kroeger lives here with her husband Chris. She's a botanist in her 60s who clones rare trees. And she's also deeply ingrained in Celtic and Druidic traditions and faith. Sarah Harris spent a day with Diana Beresford-Kroeger in her gardens and among her trees. The place was enchanting -- and it just might hold the keys to what to we can grow as the region weathers climate change.  Go to full article
It's still a little cool for transplanting tender flowers and warm weather vegetables. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/crabchick/7276027148/">crabchick</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Not quite prime time for tender transplants

The calendar is a bit ahead of the weather this spring, and that means it's probably a good idea to proceed with caution in the garden.

Mother's Day typically coincides with good weather for transplants, and garden centers and greenhouses send thousands of nicely started plants and flowers out their doors over the weekend. But this year, Cooperative Extension's Amy Ivy says, we should be extra careful about putting tender flowers and warm weather vegetables in the ground. Better to baby them for a week or two till the weather really warms up. Plants are looking for "heat units," and cool nights and days still in the 60s don't quite add up.  Go to full article
A bird's nest compost bin. Photo: Tompkins County Cooperative

Kitchen compost: a gift for the garden

Compost is a key ingredient to increasing the organic matter in garden soil. And now is a great time to add it as a layer in the garden to help nourish seeds and seedlings.

Amy Ivy, horticulturist for Cornell Cooperative in Clinton and Essex Counties, explains some of the best ways to use compost in your garden, and alternatives if you don't have your own.  Go to full article
Trillium and other iconic North Country wildflowers pose a challenge for gardeners. Archive Photo of the Day, 5/18/11: Gregory Kle

Spring wildflowers in nature and the garden

A walk in the woods may seem like an optimistic activity during mud season. But early wildflowers are a sign of hope that a new season has begun. It's amazing to find...  Go to full article
43.7? Too cold. Amy says to wait for 50 degree (F) soil temperature before planting peas. Photo: <a href="https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3646/3601931725_066a0fe319_o_d.jpg">Stephen Cochran</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

When it's right to plant peas

The sun is out. The air is warm. It's late April. The crocuses are up and the daffodils aren't far behind. So, time to plant some peas, and maybe some lettuce, right? ...  Go to full article
Spring surprise--voles at work. Photo: Martha Foley

Why does my lawn look like a giant ant farm?

The spring thaw has finally reached dirt, revealing the winter damage underneath. On lawns, that could include dramatic networks of dirt-lined runways left under this...  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/cafemama/3554624390/in/photolist-6q7nZq-9bWxWy-4FjXbD-48C15n-4B7ks-d33Bcu-4B1fJL-84PDiw-hos2oJ-kmJZQ-Po95f-9kkqg2-hovRDL-ahtbyB-ieJUqN-adLfQb-9Ak9XY-6vikT9-JVDMJ-dAKsT8-83YQcJ-6tNG25-6bCcDi-eh96Pz-6fGSZF-db5C2U-db5BxQ-db5BMC-NxEpj-a4sQ2N-8o4Pya-6f6qui-7PKvEd-4WbwDb-6KeovC-5ek7mn-4X8zQM-2kaEaN-5fgsDp-6jCjBC-7YiN6B-8sZy9F-d33BaN-d33Be9-dWehH-89JiNr-avWqyt-9LbTLM-81LwZ9-4LAwRo">Sarah Gilbert</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Gardening call in gleanings: potato scab, blueberry canes, green manure

Horticulturist Amy Ivy and Martha Foley takes up some odds and ends of questions listeners had during our ...  Go to full article

Listen: Vermont's Pete Sutherland makes rural music, with kids

Just in time for the growing season, a new album filled with songs about gardening and rural life. Vermont folk singer/songwriter Pete Sutherland is best known as a member...  Go to full article
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension

It's time to prune fruit trees

This is the best time of the season to prune your apple and other fruit trees. Horticulturist Amy Ivy has the best tips and how-to information to help insure good production.  Go to full article
Volunteers tend a community garden in Potsdam. NCPR file photo

Listen: Spring Gardening Call-in

Cornell Cooperative Extension horticulturist Amy Ivy, a Monday morning regular on The Eight O'clock Hour, was in the studio with Martha Foley today. They were...  Go to full article

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