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Astronomy
Apr 14, 2014 — Audie Cornish speaks with Fred Espenak, scientist emeritus at NASA Goddard, also known as "Mr. Eclipse," about the lunar eclipse that will happen Monday night.
Apr 8, 2014 — Scientist Lawrence Krauss says clips of him were "mined" to lend credibility to The Principle, a film he describes as "stupid" and "unbelievable."
Mar 23, 2014 — Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is everywhere these days. And his current stature is remarkable, in part because he's a black astrophysicist — seemingly as elusive a phenomenon as the Higgs boson.
Mar 6, 2014 — An astrophysicist is using something called the Z machine at Sandia National Lab to recreate the conditions on a white dwarf star — only for a few nanoseconds, but still, enough to study.
Feb 27, 2014 — The astrophysicist says that participating in a "great unfolding of a cosmic story" should make us feel large, not small. This spring, Tyson hosts a TV series called Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey.
 

Mars Call-in:
Archive of call-in about the Mars near encounter.
Mars' path over Canton

St. Lawrence University Physics Professor Dr. Aileen O'Donoghue keeps an eye on the stars for North Country Public Radio.
Astronomy questions
for Dr. O'Donoghue
.

Dr. O'Donoghue's Sky Events page

Astronomy Resources - astronomy related news, books and web resources.

More Astronomy Resources - submitted by Bruce McClure.

Apparent retrograde motion of Mars in 2003. Animation: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Apparent_retrograde_motion_of_Mars_in_2003.gif">Eugene Alvin Villar</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Apparent retrograde motion of Mars in 2003. Animation: Eugene Alvin Villar, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Spring comes to the solar system

St. Lawrence University physicist Aileen O'Donoghue stopped by the NCPR studio this morning with an update on all the ways we can chart the change of season without ever looking at a thermometer. Just watch the winter constellations, like Orion, disappear and the spring sky emerge.

She also maps out where Earth is in relation to the other planets racing around the Sun, and which ones we can see just now. Venus is still bright in the morning. We're moving away from Jupiter, and you'd probably need really good binoculars or a telescope now to see its moons. And Mars is red and bright in the east early in the evening. If you follow its motion night by night, you'll notice it's going "backwards" for a while now. She explains this retrograde motion, which was a key clue in the ancients' realization that we are not the center of the universe.  Go to full article
This year's "wobbly" polar vortex (left) compared to last year's more "compact" vortex. Image: NOAA

What's up in the sky, and what's up with the weather

The night sky, and so much more today from St. Lawrence University Physics professor Aileen O'Donoghue.

In fact it's a double-header today: the sky, and the wobbly polar vortex.  Go to full article
Crescent moon with Venus and Jupiter near. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/harshanm/3073301812/">harshanm</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Heads-up, star-gazers! Venus is back

Lots of news from St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue this morning. She stopped by the NCPR studios to share the monthly update with Martha Foley.

Item: Venus has popped back up in the morning sky.

Item: You can still see the moons of Jupiter with binoculars, in the west after dark.

Item: Groundhog Day's roots go deeper than a hill in Pennsylvania; it marks the midpoint between the winter solstice and the spring equinox.

Item: Why it's so easy to see the young crescent Moon this time of year.

And more...  Go to full article
Jupiter and the four Galilean moons. From left: Europa, Jupiter, Io, Ganymede, Callisto. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpstanley/497884413/">Jeremy Stanley</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

News of the cosmos: perihelion, Jupiter's moons and more

In the deep, deep of winter, we've lost our view of Venus, but we're gaining daylight. St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue reminds Martha Foley of the good...  Go to full article
Time lapse of Comet ISON's slingshot around the sun (white circle) on Thanksgiving Day. After the close encounter, not much was left. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Soho_c3_timelapse.jpg">NASA</a>

In the night sky as winter approaches

Astronomy Aileen O'Donoghue talks with Martha Foley about the late fall sky.

Comet ISON's anticipated big display fizzled after a too-close encounter with the...  Go to full article
Comet ISON as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope in April. Photo: NASA

In the night sky: planets, stars, even a comet on the way

We're "gaining dark" as winter approaches. That's good news for astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue. There's just more and more time to get outside and see the stars and planets now...  Go to full article
Crescent moon in twilight. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpstanley/423720850/">Jeremy Stanley</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Clear skies, longer nights offer great star-gazing

The days are getting shorter, by about three minutes every 24 hours now, and that's welcome news for Aileen O'Donoghue. It means more time for looking at the night sky. ...  Go to full article
A Perseid meteor exploding over Leuven, Belgium last night. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/88100135@N02/9496788419">Tom Davidson</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Catch a glimpse of falling stars: the Perseid meteor shower

St. Lawrence University astronomer Aileen O'Donoghue turns our attention to the wonders of the night sky, including the peak week of the Perseid meteor shower.
...  Go to full article
Jupiter near the crescent moon last April. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/herbraab/7103650931/">H. Raab</a>, CC some rights reserved

Tracking the planets this spring

We're gaining about three minutes of daylight every day now, and the winter constellations such as Orion are starting to slip below the horizon. Jupiter will be the brightest...  Go to full article
C3-class Solar Flare, Sept. 8, 2010. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4974263471/">NASA Goddard Space Flight Center</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>

Natural Selections: Solar Weather

Solar weather does more than create light shows at polar latitudes. When the sun acts up, the effects can range from communications interference on earth to lethal doses of...  Go to full article

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