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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Book Reviews

Apr 6, 2014 — Years after she first read and adored Ellen Emerson White's series of young adult novels, author Tova Mirvis still finds herself wondering, "What would Meg Powers do?"
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Mar 29, 2014 — Nick Lantz's third collection, How to Dance as the Roof Caves In, could hardly be called cheerful. But his poems of divorce and recession are accessible and entertaining, even at their most grim.
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Mar 26, 2014 — In his short story collection, former Marine Phil Klay takes his experience in Iraq and clarifies it, lucidly tracing the moral, political and psychological curlicues of Operation Iraqi Freedom.
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Mar 25, 2014 — Teju Cole's latest book describes a young New York doctor's visit back to his Nigerian hometown, where he encounters a Clockwork Orange world of misery and corruption.
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Mar 18, 2014 — Susan Rieger's new The Divorce Papers is a modern epistolary novel, chronicling a crumbling marriage in court filings, emails and hand-written notes. Critic Alan Cheuse calls it serious yet charming.
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Mar 16, 2014 — The NYRB Classics imprint has reissued William Gass's 1976 raucous philosophical inquiry into the color blue. Reviewer Juan Vidal says it's more an experience to be had than a book to be read.
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Mar 15, 2014 — Siri Hustvedt's latest uses fragmented documents to tell the story of an artist who chooses men to present her work. Reviewer Amal El-Mohtar calls the book complex, harrowing, playful and engrossing.
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Mar 13, 2014 — In 2008, Clark Rockefeller kidnapped his daughter and led police on a weeklong chase. Turned out he wasn't a Rockefeller at all; he was an impostor who happened to be friends with writer Walter Kirn.
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Feb 20, 2014 — Writer Kevin Roose followed eight new bankers through their first years on Wall Street. Reviewer Drew Toal says the book has a "solid sense of finance's corrosive day-to-day effects."
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Jan 31, 2014 — Diane Johnson often writes about American heroines living in France, but when she began her memoir, she found herself drawn back to her native ground in America's heartland. Critic Maureen Corrigan says Flyover Lives "lets scenes and conversations speak for themselves, accruing power as they lodge in readers' minds."
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