Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Tommy Trenchard for NPR
August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 29, 2014 | NPR · The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
Getty Images
August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Latest news from Novoazovsk, Ukraine, where Ukrainian forces are defending the port city from what they say is a Russian invasion. NPR's Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson from Novoazovsk.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

NPR Selected Archives

Oct 17, 2013 — While mice sleep, their brain cells shrink, allowing cerebrospinal fluid to flow easily around them. The fluid can then clear away toxins. This finding appears to offer the best explanation yet of why animals and people need sleep.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 25, 2013 — Kenyans who received money with no strings attached started businesses and bought food for their kids, according to a new study. They didn't spend it on alcohol or cigarettes.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 4, 2013 — Reading literary fiction improves people's ability to recognize other people's mental states, while popular fiction and nonfiction do not, a study says. That may be because literary fiction tends to focus on the psychology and inner lives of the characters.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 26, 2013 — Author Simon Singh's new book teases out the mathematical references hidden in The Simpsons. Singh tells NPR's Scott Simon that the show's writing team includes several trained mathematicians — and that the logical bends and breaks of writing comedy can be very appealing to the mathematically minded.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 14, 2013 — Glucosamine and chondroitin have been popular supplements for arthritis for years. But clinical trials in humans haven't shown that they're any better than sugar pills at reducing pain. Some doctors say that if placebos or supplements help people exercise and lose weight, then that's OK.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 23, 2013 — Pregnant women are told not to drink, smoke or stress out. But it hasn't been clear how those choices may affect a fetus. By studying how genes are turned on and off, scientists say they are getting closer to understanding what experiences in the womb really affect a child's health.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 8, 2013 — For the few hundred people living in the cell- and wireless-free town of Green Bank, W.Va., staying connected — to each other and to the outside world — is a daily challenge. The area is within a zone designed to protect a giant radio telescope from interference.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 11, 2013 — I majored in applied math, I have an MBA, and I'm working as a reporter at NPR. An economist just told me I'm leaving millions of dollars on the table.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 22, 2013 — After 25 years of teaching French for Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, 83-year-old Margaret Mary Vojtko was let go. She died shortly after, penniless and nearly homeless. Her story has spurred sharp anger over the treatment of part-time faculty.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 14, 2013 — After more than 50 years, Bill Baker returns to the island in an effort to analyze his life.
Launch in player | Comments |
more NPR Selected Archives from NPR