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July 24, 2014 | NPR · Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Military war dogs serve combat tours, save lives and suffer injuries like the soldiers they serve. On Capitol Hill this week, dogs and their handlers made the case that all dogs should be brought home from war and treated with the respect they've earned.
 
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July 24, 2014 | NPR · Dozens of children have filed complaints saying they were subjected to inhumane treatment at Border Patrol stations. The complaints center on the holding cells, referred to as "freezers" by migrants.
 

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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The remains of passengers of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands, on what has been a national day of mourning. Most of those killed in the jet that was brought down over Ukraine were Dutch. Robert Siegel talks with Thomas Erdbrink of The New York Times, who is in the Netherlands.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.
 
July 23, 2014 | NPR · An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, explains why this tribal people left its village.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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coffee week

Apr 27, 2013 — Throughout the region that was once the Ottoman empire, people make coffee pretty much the same way: using coffee beans ground into a fine powder, then boiled in a little brass pot. But ordering "Turkish" coffee today doesn't go over well in some Balkan or eastern Mediterranean countries that have some lingering anti-Turkish feelings.
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Apr 26, 2013 — Historians tell us that caffeine in coffee helped Western civilization "sober up" and get down to business. Now scientific research shows that at low doses, caffeine improves performance on mental tasks, especially in people who are already tired.
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Apr 26, 2013 — All this week on The Salt and on Morning Edition, we've explored the stories behind your ritual cup of joe. Watch archived video of our Coffee Week conversation in our first Google+ Hangout.
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Apr 26, 2013 — Today's commercial coffee production is based on only a tiny slice of the genetic varieties that have grown since prehistoric times. And that's a problem, because it leaves the world's coffee supply vulnerable to shocks like climate change, or the leaf rust currently ravaging Latin American coffee farms.
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Apr 26, 2013 — After years of not understanding coffee, Jerry Seinfeld says he's finally discovered the delight of meeting someone over a cup. "You have coffee and for some reason it makes you talk a lot," he says.
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Apr 25, 2013 — You think clovers and hearts are impressive? Wait till you get a load of these Japanese latte drawings. A culture that values the beauty of the ephemeral has brought us a new level of art in foam.
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Apr 25, 2013 — About a century ago, a beautiful tradition emerged in the Italian city of Naples: Cafe-goers would buy a cup of coffee anonymously and in advance for a less-fortunate stranger. With much of Europe now in tight financial times, the custom is spreading across the continent.
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Apr 25, 2013 — From handpicking to sorting, it's women's hands that take on much of the labor involved in producing coffee around the world. New initiatives are empowering women to reap more of the financial rewards.
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Apr 24, 2013 — Once people figured out how to roast the seeds of the Coffea plant in the 1400s, coffee took over the world. In doing so, it fueled creativity, revolutions, new business ventures, literature, music — and slavery.
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Apr 24, 2013 — It doesn't take much effort to find bags of coffee with labels that promise social and environmental improvements. But each one of these certification programs promises something different for the farmer and the land — and every promise involves some compromises.
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