Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
Warner Bros/The Kobal Collection
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Getty Images
August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, more than 160 people have been arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
AP
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AFP/Getty Images
August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Most E-mailed Stories of 2007

Feb 22, 2007 — A growing number of people seeking to keep runny noses and stuffy heads at bay are turning to saline irrigation. In essence, you're flushing your nasal passages out with a saline solution. Research suggests it works.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 15, 2007 — A new study in the journal Child Development shows that if you teach students that their intelligence isn't fixed — that it can grow and increase — they do better in school.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 22, 2007 — Actor Terrence Howard introduces viewers to the film Knocking." It's a look inside the Jehovah's Witness religion. He talks candidly about the film and his personal connection to the faith.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 31, 2007 — Considered a sacred crop by the Incas, quinoa has been classified as a "super crop" by the United Nations because of its high protein content. Quinoa plants produce nutty, earthy-tasting kernels that are great in pilafs, soups and porridges.
Comments |
Feb 16, 2007 — For reasons that remain mostly mysterious, the note we call "B flat" does the oddest things. It aggravates alligators, it lurks in the stairwell of an office building, and it emanates from a supermassive black hole 250 million light years from Earth.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 5, 2007 — Recent studies confirm what publishing executives have long suspected: Women read more than men. It's not clear why but theories abound, ranging from early childhood development to the differences between the male and female brain.
Comments |
Jan 18, 2007 — Late-night online chats with friends can make for rough mornings, and can eventually take a toll on a teen's health. Dr. Helene Emsellem offers advice for night-owl teens.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 2, 2007 — For years, scientists believed the brain's structure couldn't be changed. The new science of neuroplasticity says that's not the case, and argue the brain is much more flexible than previously thought. Science writer Sharon Begley talks about her new book, Train Your Mind, Change Your Brain.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 30, 2007 — Six black high school students could face decades in prison if found guilty in the beating of a white student in a dispute over a "whites only" tree. Their supporters say the charges are disproportionate to the crime and charge prosecutors with racism.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 22, 2007 — Rafe Esquith has taught kids from some of the toughest neighborhoods in Los Angeles. His book, 'Teach Like Your Hair's On Fire,' outlines the methods he's found to be successful.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Most E-mailed Stories of 2007 from NPR