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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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chemical weapons

Jun 23, 2014 — Nine months after the mission started, the last remaining chemicals that had been identified for removal from Syria were loaded on a Danish ship. The OPCW called it a "major landmark."
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May 13, 2014 — Meanwhile, a defector has handed the U.S. government 11,000 pictures the opposition says shows systematic torture. France is pushing for President Bashar Assad to be tried for war crimes.
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Apr 26, 2014 — Syria appears likely to meet Sunday's deadline for handing over its chemical arsenal. But President Bashar Assad hasn't been weakened. His forces currently have the upper hand in the civil war.
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Jan 30, 2014 — Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel echoed concerns expressed by the international watchdog group overseeing the operation that Syria is not meeting deadlines for handing over dangerous chemicals.
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Jan 7, 2014 — A U.N. official said a Danish commercial vessel carrying the cache is now in international waters, waiting on another batch.
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Dec 17, 2013 — The U.S., Norway, Denmark and Italy are all involved in one way or another. Deadly ingredients will be loaded on to trucks, driven to the sea, put on ships and eventually made safe before being delivered to a commercial waste disposal facility.
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Dec 12, 2013 — The inspectors' final report confirms some earlier allegations, citing "clear and convincing evidence" that the weapons were used against civilians in Ghouta, near Damascus. Other cases were less clear.
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Dec 6, 2013 — The world wants Syria's chemical arsenal destroyed. But so far, no country has offered to do the dirty work on its soil. Over the past week, an alternative has gained ground: Carry out the destruction at sea. The plan taking shape is complicated and untested, but it just might work.
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Nov 30, 2013 — The U.S. plans to destroy the chemicals at sea using a process called hydrolysis. The organization charged by the international community with overseeing the destruction of Syria's chemical stockpile said private companies will likely be contracted to neutralize some other weapons.
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Nov 22, 2013 — The cost of the project would be capped at $54 million, according to the group running the effort to rid Syria of chemical weapons. And contractors must be able to move quickly.
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more chemical weapons from NPR