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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year, and it can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot titled "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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neuroscience

Jun 17, 2014 — Scientists have evidence that beats in the brain — in the form of rhythmic electrical pulses — are involved in everything from memory to motion. And music can help when those rhythms go wrong.
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Jun 16, 2014 — Can thinking about how the brain works also change how we think about crime and punishment? Commentator Tania Lombrozo says new research suggests it may be so.
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Jun 2, 2014 — Scientists seem to have answered a fundamental question about the nature of memory. They have found compelling evidence that memories are made by strengthening connections between certain brain cells.
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May 30, 2014 — There are songs that just make people want to get up and shake their booty. Why? Scientists say the most enticing rhythms have something missing — beats that your body can't help but fill in.
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May 26, 2014 — When Milena Channing was 29 years old she was blinded by a stroke. But the injury left her with connections from her eyes to the part of the brain that detects motion.
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May 14, 2014 — Small electrical pulses make people feel that they can control their dreams, the hallmark of lucid dreams. But researchers are far away from inducing powers like those seen in the movie Inception.
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May 8, 2014 — Scientists have found that a hormone associated with long life also seems to make people smarter. The gene strengthens the connections between brain cells, a process that's essential for learning.
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Apr 17, 2014 — The Sichuan peppercorn that makes our mouths tingle activates the same neurons as when our foot falls asleep. Scientists are hoping the connection unlocks clues for how to turn those neurons off.
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Apr 8, 2014 — Childhood amnesia descends gradually — and later than you might think, researchers say. Many 7-year-olds have robust memories of experiences from when they were 3 or even younger.
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Mar 31, 2014 — Scientists are studying the way we show complex emotions. It turns out we're better at it than was previously thought, mixing and matching basic expressions with sophistication — and consistency.
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