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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Foreign ministers meeting Tuesday in Brussels are threatening deep sanctions against Russia over the Malaysia Airlines crash. But some nations might hesitate because of their economic ties to Russia.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks to Anton La Guardia, who covers the European Union for The Economist, about the possibility of deep EU sanctions against Russia at Tuesday's foreign ministers meeting.
 
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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tells NPR the nation can't "absorb" all migrants fleeing violence and must secure its own border first. He dismissed potential 2016 rival Hillary Clinton as old news.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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learning

Jun 30, 2014 — When researchers asked young children to figure out an experiment using cause and effect, they did a much better job than young adults. That may be because their thinking is more flexible and fluid.
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Feb 14, 2014 — People with dyslexia take longer to alternate their attention between visual and audio cues, researchers say. That's particularly true if they have to attend to a sound after seeing something. That difference may provide clues to better treatments for dyslexia.
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Dec 9, 2013 — Students around the country are gearing up for final exams, including often-disparaged multiple choice tests. Is their bad rap deserved? Commentator Tania Lombrozo looks at some research suggesting it's not.
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Oct 3, 2013 — Matt Haimovitz is 42 and a world-renowned cellist. His mother took him to many concerts as a kid, but nothing in his family history explains where he got his extraordinary talent. And that's typical, says Ellen Winner, a psychology professor at Boston College who has spent much of her career studying prodigies.
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Sep 2, 2013 — Even infants too young to discern the meaning of words seem better able to learn while listening to the sound of human speech than while listening to nonsense — speech run backward. Little surprise there, perhaps, but a study shows that recordings of lemur calls spark learning, too.
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Aug 4, 2013 — Some birds can dance. These dancing birds can also learn to make vocal sounds by listening to others. They share this ability with humans. But our primate cousins don't seem to be so endowed. Alva No asks if there is, indeed, a connection between vocal learning and the ability to dance.
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May 16, 2013 — The results are preliminary, and alpha parents seeking an edge for their children shouldn't risk electrocution. Still, the findings are provocative and may lead researchers down a new road.
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May 6, 2013 — In elementary school, girls often outperform boys on reading and math tests. Many factors shape academic performance, but two economists say one reason for the disparity might be that parents spend more time reading with girls and teaching them the alphabet and numbers.
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Nov 12, 2012 — For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.
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Feb 2, 2012 — When Koko the gorilla plays tones on a recorder, she skillfully controls her breathing patterns. Commentator Barbara J. King explains why this is unexpected for a gorilla — and what it may mean for challenging ourselves to learn new skills throughout life.
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