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July 23, 2014 | NPR · A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Vice President Joe Biden has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Conservation

Jul 1, 2014 — One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes.
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Jun 8, 2014 — Alan Rabinowitz grew up with a terrible stutter, but he felt comforted by the big cats at the zoo. Now an accomplished jaguar expert, Rabinowitz tells his touching boyhood story in a book for kids.
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Feb 2, 2013 — Zac Unger moved to Churchill, Manitoba, to cover the decline of the polar bear. It was 2008, and the adorable predators had become symbols in the battle over climate change. But the story he ended up writing in his new book was more complicated than he expected.
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Jul 1, 2011 — Almost half of the fish we eat has been raised on farms — and the genetic modification of fish is increasing. Paul Greenberg writes about changes in the fishing industry — and what the future holds for our dinner tables — in his book, Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food.
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Jul 29, 2010 — Lifelong angler Paul Greenberg fuses investigative journalism, travelogue and personal memoir into one grand meditation on humankind's relationship with the ocean. Four Fish asks readers "to reevaluate whether fish are at their root expendable seafood or wildlife desperately in need of our compassion."
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Jul 19, 2010 — Almost half of the fish we eat has been raised on farms — and the genetic modification of fish is increasing. Paul Greenberg writes about changes in the fishing industry — and what the future holds for our dinner tables — in his new book, Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food.
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Jul 9, 2010 — When Paul Greenberg started fishing as a kid in the '70s, he didn't have to think twice about dwindling wild fish populations. That was before the world nearly doubled its fish consumption. Four Fish is Greenberg's investigation into the future of the last wild food.
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Jul 26, 2009 — Our search for the most fascinating new science books finds true tales of Aztec super-athletes, criminal butterfly collectors, Isaac Newton's unknown detective career and the mysteries of the human stomach and brain.
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May 11, 2009 — Journalist and author Peter Laufer uncovered The Dangerous World of Butterflies for his new book. He discusses the history of criminality and intrigue that surrounds conservationists and collectors of a icon of innocence.
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May 11, 2009 — No one knows how monarchs do it, but these butterflies migrate from far north, sometimes even from Canada, to spend their winters in Michoacan, Mexico.
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