Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Foreign ministers meeting Tuesday in Brussels are threatening deep sanctions against Russia over the Malaysia Airlines crash. But some nations might hesitate because of their economic ties to Russia.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks to Anton La Guardia, who covers the European Union for The Economist, about the possibility of deep EU sanctions against Russia at Tuesday's foreign ministers meeting.
 
Getty
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tells NPR the nation can't "absorb" all migrants fleeing violence and must secure its own border first. He dismissed potential 2016 rival Hillary Clinton as old news.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

African American soldiers

Jan 10, 2013 — In his new book, The Double V, Rawn James Jr. argues that to understand race in America one must understand the history of African-Americans in the military. While the turning point came between the world wars, the struggle began with the American Revolution.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 16, 2012 — With the recent release of Steven Spielberg's Lincoln, the Civil War has been a hot topic. But for some people, like Rod Coddington, it's always an area of interest — blockbuster or not.
Comments |
Jun 8, 2012 — This week, the Library of Congress announced that Natasha Trethewey, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Native Guard, will be the next poet laureate of the United States. Trethewey, a native of Mississippi, is the first Southern poet laureate since 1986.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jan 20, 2009 — Natasha Trethewey won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for poetry for her book Native Guard. Her parents had an interracial marriage while it was still illegal in Mississippi, and Tretheway's poetry often draws on her childhood as a biracial child in the south.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 5, 2008 — Just hours before he died last month, Samuel Snow finally got his wish. The Army formally apologized to the World War II vet and affirmed his honorable discharge. NPR's Tony Cox speaks with journalist Jack Hamann, author of On American Soil, and Lashell Drake, granddaughter of one of the exonerated veterans.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 6, 2008 — In his new book, Brendan I. Koerner recounts the almost unbelievable tale of Herman Perry. An African-American soldier serving in Burma, Perry became the subject of the greatest manhunt of World War II.
Comments |
Jul 16, 2007 — Natasha Trethewey was recently awarded the Pulitzer Prize for her poetry collection Native Guard. Trethewey grew up bi-racial in Mississippi, and her mother was murdered by her stepfather; these, along with the South, are recurring themes in her poetry.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 12, 2005 — Historian Alice Kaplan's new book The Interpreter describes the disproportionately large number of black World War II soldiers publicly executed by the U.S. military in Europe.
Launch in player | Comments |
May 22, 2005 — In 1944, an Italian prisoner of war was found hanged at a U.S. Army base near Seattle. The trial of three black soldiers that followed was the Army's longest during World War II. Jack Hamann's new book says it ended in a miscarriage of justice.
Launch in player | Comments |
more African American soldiers from NPR