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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. It will perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 22, 2014 | NPR · Washington Gov. Jay Inslee offers an update on the deadly mudslides near the town of Oso in March. President Obama is visiting Oso on Tuesday.
 
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April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Army plans to take all Apache attack helicopters from the National Guard. The Guard says that's an insult, but Army leaders say it's not personal — it's just about saving money.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The White House named Neil Eggleston its new top lawyer. He'll have to muster his legal and political skills to deal with a divided Congress and multiple investigations of the Obama's administration.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Trials, litigation, etc

Sep 22, 2013 — Samantha Geimer was victimized twice: once by an infamous Hollywood director who fled prosecution after raping her when she was 13, and again by a relentless media, which has hounded her for the past three decades.
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May 20, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Jenny Rosenstrach examines dinnertime, Kate Summerscale recounts a scandalous Victorian trial, and John Dramani Mahama looks back on his childhood in Ghana. In fiction, Victor Davis Hanson reimagines an ancient battle, and Marie NDiaye follows three women from Senegal to Europe.
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May 18, 2013 — Less than two months into her study abroad program in Italy, Amanda Knox was accused and eventually convicted of murdering her roommate, Meredith Kercher. After her conviction was overturned, Knox returned home to Seattle — and now faces a potential retrial. Knox tells her story in a new memoir.
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Jan 27, 2013 — Bill Macumber, a respected member of his Arizona community, was convicted of a grisly 1962 double murder. Late last year, however, he was released from prison. A new book tells the story of a flawed investigation and legal process that cost Macumber 38 years of freedom.
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Jul 31, 2012 — This summer, don't be a tourist — take a journey with these travel memoirs instead. Open these five books and meet a future First Lady, a one-booted hiker on the Pacific Crest Trail and a young Angela Davis. You'll encounter beauty, bravery, and chilling strangeness — without ever leaving the couch.
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Jun 19, 2012 — In Mrs. Robinson's Disgrace, Kate Summerscale reconstructs the everyday private life and very public shaming of Isabella Robinson, a wife sued for divorce over her scandalous diary entries in the early days of England's divorce court.
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Jun 17, 2012 — Lynn Neary talks to three critics about books you shouldn't miss. One critic says it's a particularly rich literary summer because in election years, publishers release the juiciest books before fall.
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Apr 11, 2011 — In an ancient Greek tale, Clytemnestra kills her husband, Agamemnon, after he sacrifices their daughter, Iphigenia. New Yorker journalist Janet Malcolm spots parallels in a case from a Forest Hills, N.Y., courtroom. Her telling of the case shakes and disturbs you like the smartest nonfiction can.
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Mar 27, 2011 — Fifty years ago one of the chief operators of the mass execution of Jews was tried for crimes against humanity. In her new book, The Eichmann Trial, author and historian Deborah Lipstadt explains how the trial transformed Jewish life and changed our perception of the victims of genocide.
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Apr 22, 2010 — Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown shares with Steve Inskeep the best things she's been reading lately: on making too much money, almost selling sex, and murder in a city known for sin.
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