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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · China has begun investigations into one of the country's senior politicians. Zhou Yongkang was a former domestic security chief, and he's suspected of "serious disciplinary violations."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Jerusalem

Jan 10, 2014Jerusalem, a 2012 cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi, returns to the list at No. 13.
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Aug 30, 2013 — At No. 13, Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi explore a city's food in their cookbook Jerusalem.
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Dec 25, 2012 — The rebels, rule breakers and renegades who rule this year's Top 10 list aren't looking for a Ph.D. in Traditional Cooking. They're pleasure seekers whose books are filled with quirky facts, gorgeous pictures and ingredients deployed in unexpected places.
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Oct 15, 2012 — Chefs Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi say their latest cookbook is a chance to re-imagine the recipes of their childhoods, reminiscing about Jerusalem's open-air food markets and street food.
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Jul 5, 2012 — In fiction, Erin Morgenstern conjures star-crossed magicians, Rachel DeWoskin revisits the horrors of high school, and Dean Bakopoulos' widower pursues new love. In nonfiction, James Carroll visits the real and imagined Jerusalem.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of A Woman in Jerusalem by Abraham B. Yehoshua and Hillel Halkin. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 13, 2011 — Atheist Philip Pullman imagines that Jesus had a brother, while Howard Norman plumbs the effects of family tragedy in Nova Scotia, and Michael Gruber probes the life of a Taliban American. In nonfiction: the late Sen. Ted Kennedy's memoir, and Kai Bird examines both sides of the Palestinian/Israeli divide.
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Mar 30, 2011 — In the 1970s, writer Elena Gorokhova sat in her apartment in St. Petersburg — then Leningrad — writing books she knew wouldn't make it past the censors. She recommends three revolutionary reads affirming that the human voice endures, even under the most suffocating circumstances.
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Mar 27, 2011 — Fifty years ago one of the chief operators of the mass execution of Jews was tried for crimes against humanity. In her new book, The Eichmann Trial, author and historian Deborah Lipstadt explains how the trial transformed Jewish life and changed our perception of the victims of genocide.
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Mar 12, 2011 — Jerusalem has many identities — some real, some imagined. It's known as "the city of peace," but author James Carroll identifies it as the "home base of religious violence." In his new book Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Carroll traces the history of this holy city and how it has shaped the modern world.
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