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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Judicial error

Jan 27, 2013 — Bill Macumber, a respected member of his Arizona community, was convicted of a grisly 1962 double murder. Late last year, however, he was released from prison. A new book tells the story of a flawed investigation and legal process that cost Macumber 38 years of freedom.
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Jul 2, 2012 — Author Solomon Jones says death can seem angelic at first — especially to the lost, addicted kids in his book The Last Confession. He says many of his stories come from his own experiences as a homeless drug addict on the streets of Philadelphia.
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Apr 25, 2012 — The recent documentary Bully and a series of tragic stories have brought national attention to the issue. NPR's Michel Martin asks whether there's something important missing from the conversation: the question "why?"
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Arthur And George by Julian Barnes. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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May 24, 2011 — In 1989, a white female jogger was brutally raped in New York City's Central Park. Author Sarah Burns revisits the crime — and the wrongful conviction that put five African-American teens in prison.
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Dec 15, 2010 — The topics of murder, theft and wartime made for some thrilling fiction this year. Critic Maureen Corrigan of Fresh Air picks the best mystery and suspense novels of 2010, in which the past comes back to haunt.
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Oct 11, 2006 — John Grisham says he could never have come up with the story that's chronicled in his first work of nonfiction, The Innocent Man. It's the tragic tale of Ron Williamson, a small-town sports hero from Oklahoma wrongly convicted of murder.
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Jan 26, 2006 — An infamous case of wrongful conviction — which took the efforts of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to resolve — is the subject of the new novel from Julian Barnes. Arthur and George vividly details how the lives of two utter strangers intersected in what was known as "the Great Wyrley Outrages."
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