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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Slavery

Apr 16, 2014 — The announcement of the winners and finalists for the Pulitzer Prizes gives us an opportunity to herald great journalism that illuminates matters relating to race, ethnicity and culture.
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Mar 28, 2014 — In a his book, historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution.
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Nov 20, 2013 — On Tuesday night, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night.
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Nov 15, 2013 — The 1853 memoir of free man turned captive Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave, appears at No. 10.
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Sep 17, 2013 — In Ebony & Ivy, an MIT historian details how the nation's colleges helped justify and benefited from the slave trade.
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Aug 15, 2013 — Through years of careful research, author Andrea Stuart discovered that her bloodline includes both slaves and slave owners. In her book Sugar in the Blood, she writes about her own family, and about the history of slavery in the Caribbean.
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Feb 4, 2013 — In her new book, Andrea Stuart explores the intersection of sugar, slavery, settlement, migration and survival in the Americas. Stuart's personal history was shaped by these forces — she is descended from a slave owner who had relations with an unknown slave.
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Jan 7, 2013 — In a new book, Civil War historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution. Integral to the Union's victory, he says, were the nearly 200,000 black soldiers who enlisted.
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Jul 16, 2012 — In Help Me to Find My People, Heather Andrea Williams uses artifacts from the post-Civil War era to explore the emotional toll of separation on families during slavery, and of their arduous journeys to reconnect.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Washington, D.C., in the 1830s was a city of ferment. Free blacks were moving in, eventually outnumbering the city's slaves — a development that made whites very nervous. Those tensions came to a head in the now-forgotten race riot of 1835, an episode detailed in author Jefferson Morley's new book.
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