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April 21, 2014 | NPR · More than 200 people remain missing after the ferry capsized last week. One family was told their daughter was dead instead of missing. It turns out authorities had confused her for another girl.
 
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April 21, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.
 
April 21, 2014 | NPR · Hamid Mir, one of Pakistan's most famous journalists, was shot and wounded by gunmen as he was driving down a busy street in Karachi. It's the second such attack this month on a journalist.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
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April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Origin

Dec 1, 2012 — "Ours is not a bloodline, but a text line," say father-daughter author team Amos Oz and Fania Oz-Salzberger. Their new book, Jews And Words, explores the significance of text in the Jewish tradition. "For thousands of years, we Jews had nothing but books," Oz says. "They became part of the family life."
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Nov 10, 2011 — A letter found deep in archives in London has helped settle the debate over who deserves credit for what many say is the most important astronomical discovery of the 20th century: the realization that the universe is expanding.
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Sep 23, 2011 — Your time, delivered through digital devices that move to nanosecond cadences, has never existed before in human history. As we rush through our overheated days we can barely recognize this new time for what it really is: an invention. And it's killing us.
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May 12, 2011 — Anthropologists and archeologists long believed humans evolved in Asia. So when a set of hominid remains was discovered in Africa, it took a while for the find to stick. In Born in Africa, author Martin Meredith details the battles in the search for the origins of human life.
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Apr 13, 2011 — English is definitely changing, but whether it's declining or evolving depends on who — ahem, whom — you ask. Writer Robert Lane Greene recommends three books about what it means to speak and write "well" — when the definition of "well" is a moving target.
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Mar 20, 2008 — Today, as Christians around the world commemorate Good Friday, Christian scholar and former priest John Dominic Crossan joins Fresh Air to discuss the historical Jesus, the role of crucifixion in antiquity, and the beginnings of Christianity.
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Nov 26, 2006 — In his new book Thumbs, Toes and Tears, author Chip Walter explores the physical and behavioral traits that are unique to humans. He notes that humans are the only creatures to cry, and that technological advances mark another front in our evolution.
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Aug 21, 2005 — Our founding myth suggests the Americas were a lightly populated wilderness before Europeans arrived. Historian Charles C. Mann compiled evidence of a far more complex and populous pre-Columbian society. He tells John Ydstie about 1491.
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