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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · One of the worst byproducts of our industrial society is air pollution. It's a global problem that humans have yet to get under control. One scientist thinks we might not be alone, though. Alien civilizations may be polluting their worlds, and that pollution might be one way to detect them.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Foreign relations

Dec 8, 2013 — Former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in 2007. Heraldo Munoz, who led the United Nations investigation into her death, portrays the tense political climate that surrounded Bhutto's return to politics and the circumstances of the killing in his new book.
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Oct 16, 2013 — In 1953, President Dwight Eisenhower appointed John Foster Dulles as secretary of state, and Allen Dulles as director of the CIA. In his new book, The Brothers, journalist Stephen Kinzer says the Dulles' actions "helped set off some of the world's most profound long-term crises."
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Sep 29, 2013 — Sharing power in the Eisenhower administration, John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles were the forefathers of using covert operations to upset foreign governments. Journalist Stephen Kinzer, who wrote a book on the siblings, says Americans are still paying the price for them.
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Sep 16, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Stephen Tobolowski recalls his time as a character actor, Walter Stahr profiles Lincoln's adviser, David Byrne relates his ideas on music and Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson investigate failing states. In fiction, Attica Locke weaves a murder mystery in the Deep South.
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Jul 1, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Crist looks at America's conflict with Iran and Oliver Sacks investigates hallucinations. In fiction, Ian McEwan delivers a Cold War thriller, Tom Wolfe explores racial and ethnic conflict in Miami and Emma Straub tracks a small town girl's rise to Hollywood stardom.
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May 31, 2013 — Historian Mary Louise Roberts' new book explores the interactions between soldiers and French women after the U.S. liberated France. She found that American soldiers horrified some towns by having sex with prostitutes in public places, and 1944 saw a wave of rape accusations against GIs.
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May 18, 2013 — In this Q&A, author Elliott Holt discusses her six favorite novels about expatriates. She also talks about what it's like to be in your 20s, and the importance of travel and exploration.
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Apr 10, 2013 — As a journalist with Britain's The Guardian newspaper, Rory Carroll spent seven years living in Venezuela. His new book on Venezuela's recently deceased president explores Hugo Chavez's popularity with the poor and critiques his failures in governance and management.
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Mar 15, 2013 — At No. 3, Rachel Maddow's Drift argues that military bloat has led to a state of near-perpetual war.
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Mar 4, 2013 — In fiction, Nathan Englander's short stories, Amanda Coplin's Pacific Northwest drama and Anthony Giardina's tale of miscalculated suburban escape arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Rachel Maddow takes stock of America's perpetual wars and Lauren F. Winner reflects on her crisis of faith.
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