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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"-- where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · The Supreme Court has recently ruled that mandatory life sentences, without parole, for juveniles are unconstitutional, but states have varied in how they've complied with these decisions.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Health

Nov 25, 2013 — In The Man He Became, historian James Tobin says, despite misimpressions to the contrary, Americans of Franklin Roosevelt's day were well-aware of his disability — it was an important part of the personal narrative that helped him win the presidency.
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Aug 16, 2013 — In Brain on Fire, appearing at No. 9, Susannah Cahalan looks back on her battle with a rare disease.
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Aug 5, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Randall examines the science of sleep, and Susannah Cahalan falls prey to a mysterious disease. In fiction, Claire Vaye Watkins explores the American West, and Ivan Doig looks at a single dad whose world is upended.
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Aug 2, 2013 — Yes, they're slimy and squishy and move on their own mucus, but here's a little secret about snails: They have teeth. Lots and lots and lots of teeth. The snail in our story had 2,640 of them, until they fell out. But not to worry. They grow back.
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Feb 18, 2013 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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Feb 15, 2013 — Al Roker won fame as the ever-smiling weatherman on NBC's Today show. But he also endured years of indignities because of his weight. That was until he had bariatric surgery, and lost more than 100 pounds. During this encore presentation, Roker talks with host Michel Martin about his experiences, and his latest book, Never Goin' Back.
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Jan 28, 2013 — Roker won fame as the ever-smiling weatherman on NBC's Today show. But he also endured years of indignities because of his weight. Then, in 2001, he had bariatric surgery and lost more than 100 pounds. Roker speaks with NPR's Michel Martin about his experiences and his latest book, Never Goin' Back.
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Dec 3, 2012 — This year's treasures include a heart-racing memoir, a fun first novel, a fascinating study of fraternal bonds, plus Toni Morrison's Home and Christopher Hitchens' last work. Critic Heller McAlpin has sifted through piles of new publications and panned for literary gold.
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Nov 19, 2012 — Novelist Richard Mason explores belle epoque pleasures, biographer Jean Baker champions sex educator Margaret Sanger, journalist A.J. Jacobs gets healthy, comedian Bill Cosby outsmarts his grandkids, and writer Geoff Dyer takes on filmmaker Andrei Tarkovsky.
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Nov 13, 2012 — The world's first essayist, Michel Montaigne, was out riding one day when he got slammed from the rear, was thrown from his horse, crashed to the ground and for a brief time was, as he puts it, "dead." He described exactly what it felt like. Here's what he learned.
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