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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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bacteria

Aug 12, 2014 — A British cheesemonger wants to translate a French guide to raw milk microbiology into English. She says it has the potential to revolutionize our approach to cheese flavor and safety.
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Jul 24, 2014 — Is this 2014 or 1348? The plague — yes, the infamous Black Death — was reported in China and Colorado. It's the same disease as the Middle Ages pandemic. Only now we know how to treat it.
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Jul 7, 2014 — To create accountability and transparency, some raw milk producers are coming up with guidelines for testing and safety. But federal agencies say all raw milk is still risky to consume.
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Mar 15, 2014 — Looks like the old adage about when it's safe to eat dropped foods may actually be effective for wet, sticky stuff like candies. For carpet-dusted snacks, you can take your sweet time, a study finds.
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Mar 5, 2014 — Removing bacteria and other impurities from water could be done more cheaply thanks to researchers at MIT. They're taking advantage of the way trees move water to filter it.
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Nov 25, 2013 — Making your own cheese and yogurt is all the rage these days. Now a scientist has taken the DIY craze to an entirely new level. She and an artist have made cheeses using the microcritters on their own skin, as well as those from famous folks. The curds are on display at a museum.
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Nov 18, 2013 — Anxious mice calm down when they get an infusion of gut microbes from mellow mice. That has scientists wondering if gut microbes play a role in the human brain, too. Research on that is only just beginning. But it's intriguing to think there could be a real truth to the phrase "gut feelings."
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Nov 8, 2013 — It may be possible to cultivate a healthier community of bacteria on and inside us by modifying our diet. For starters, eating more vegetables probably won't hurt.
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Nov 6, 2013 — Parents of new babies know they get sick a lot. That may be because infants deliberately suppress their immune systems so that essential microbes have a chance to settle in. An immune suppression system in the blood of newborn babies could be key to building a healthy microbiome.
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Nov 4, 2013 — Scientists are asking people to contribute samples of their gut microbes to help figure out how those microbes affect human health. But ethicists say sharing that information, as well as the personal health data that make it useful to researchers, poses risks. That's especially true for children.
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