Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
AP
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
Courtesy of Prime Group
September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff, whom the group threatened to kill two weeks ago.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
NPR
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Policy-ish

Aug 29, 2014 — Requiring every center that performs abortions to meet all the standards of a surgical center is excessively restrictive, says the federal district court judge who blocked the state rule Friday.
Comments |
Aug 28, 2014 — A Texas law would require doctors' offices and clinics that perform abortions to comply with regulations that apply to ambulatory surgical centers. The change could lead to a loss of services.
Comments |
Aug 26, 2014 — The question will be if Kevin Counihan can replicate his success in Connecticut with the federal health exchange, which was plagued with problems. The goal: A smoother Year Two for Obamacare.
Comments |
Aug 15, 2014 — The Affordable Care Act has allowed many young adults to stay on their parents' insurance. A study suggests the coverage may be helping more of them get treatment for mental health issues.
Comments |
Aug 8, 2014 — State legislatures have passed laws that require doctors to have hospital admitting privileges to perform abortions. Some courts are now saying these laws are unconstitutional.
Comments |
Aug 7, 2014 — In the case of an elderly patient with multiple medical problems, having a team of health workers deliver care to the home can be cheaper than expensive stays in nursing homes and emergency rooms.
Comments |
Aug 6, 2014 — Medicare is paying for HIV drugs for hundreds of patients who may not have the disease, an inspector general's investigation finds. A 77-year-old woman with no record of HIV got $33,500 of medication.
Comments |
Aug 5, 2014 — The biggest jump since 2013 has been in states that expanded Medicaid and created insurance exchanges. Arkansas has fared best — reducing its percentage of uninsured from 22 to 12.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 5, 2014 — As early as 2015, firms with more than 200 employees may have to automatically enroll their workers in a company health plan. Though workers can opt out, some still find the provision patronizing.
Comments |
Aug 5, 2014 — In Cleveland, a public hospital may be succeeding at the seemingly impossible: saving money while making patients healthier. It's doing so by giving patients personalized attention.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Policy-ish from NPR