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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. It will perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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science

Apr 17, 2014 — A team of international scientists have found four species of insects with reversed sex organs. The females' anatomy may have to do with their need for nutrients that only males produce.
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Mar 10, 2014 — NASA needs Russian rockets to reach the International Space Station, and Russia needs NASA's money to help finance operations.
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Feb 14, 2014 — Twenty-six percent in a survey of 2,200 people conducted in 2012 answered that the Sun revolves around the Earth, and fewer than half correctly answered a question about human origins.
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Jan 10, 2014 — Astronomy professor Alicia Soderberg is turning the final moments of stars into music. In doing so, she's learning just how different the supernova explosions can be.
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Dec 12, 2013 — Harvard graduate students testing preschoolers who got music training said they could not establish a link between the exposure and improved IQs.
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Dec 6, 2013 — Last week commentator Alva NoŽ drew readers' ire by suggesting that there is a conflict between science and both religion and common sense. He takes another stab at the matter here.
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Nov 25, 2013 — The little flier mimics the movements of a sea creature — and that makes it even more stable in the air that some robots based on the way insects and birds move, researchers say. Their work may lead to tiny drones that are used for studying pollution.
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Nov 25, 2013 — What would you get if you challenged Ph.D. students to explain their work through dance? You'd get this: 31 creative, fun, silly and educational videos. Let's salsa to some serious research!
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Sep 25, 2013Entelognathus primordialis, which lived some 420 million years ago, is the earliest known creature with a modern jaw. It could upend our understanding of how jawed vertebrates evolved.
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Sep 19, 2013 — The U.S. has had poet laureates, who seem to have worked out well, promoting poetry to the masses. But a bill to similarly sing the praises of scientific discovery and get more young people considering science careers is falling victim to politics.
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