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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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science

Mar 10, 2014 — NASA needs Russian rockets to reach the International Space Station, and Russia needs NASA's money to help finance operations.
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Feb 14, 2014 — Twenty-six percent in a survey of 2,200 people conducted in 2012 answered that the Sun revolves around the Earth, and fewer than half correctly answered a question about human origins.
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Jan 10, 2014 — Astronomy professor Alicia Soderberg is turning the final moments of stars into music. In doing so, she's learning just how different the supernova explosions can be.
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Dec 12, 2013 — Harvard graduate students testing preschoolers who got music training said they could not establish a link between the exposure and improved IQs.
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Dec 6, 2013 — Last week commentator Alva No drew readers' ire by suggesting that there is a conflict between science and both religion and common sense. He takes another stab at the matter here.
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Nov 25, 2013 — The little flier mimics the movements of a sea creature — and that makes it even more stable in the air that some robots based on the way insects and birds move, researchers say. Their work may lead to tiny drones that are used for studying pollution.
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Nov 25, 2013 — What would you get if you challenged Ph.D. students to explain their work through dance? You'd get this: 31 creative, fun, silly and educational videos. Let's salsa to some serious research!
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Sep 25, 2013Entelognathus primordialis, which lived some 420 million years ago, is the earliest known creature with a modern jaw. It could upend our understanding of how jawed vertebrates evolved.
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Sep 19, 2013 — The U.S. has had poet laureates, who seem to have worked out well, promoting poetry to the masses. But a bill to similarly sing the praises of scientific discovery and get more young people considering science careers is falling victim to politics.
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Sep 9, 2013 — Why can't believers and nonbelievers have civil conversations about their disagreements? Commentator Tania Lombrozo calls for creating charitable ground, space where supporters of both science and religion can talk openly about their beliefs without fear of recrimination.
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