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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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cooking

Dec 24, 2013 — A beauty product in the kitchen? Cooking gurus have been advocating this secret weapon since the 1970s to achieve crispy duck skin that will blow them away (sorry!). Here at NPR, we also used the salon appliance to make some killer s'mores.
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Nov 18, 2013 — Dust off that old Mr. Coffee! We've stumbled upon a wacky use for classic coffee makers: Cook a three-course meal for one. From poached salmon and pumpkin soup to steamed broccoli and couscous, the possibilities are endless. But why in the world would anyone want to cook this way?
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Sep 4, 2013 — Range hoods are designed to capture the pollutants from your stove, but many models are not effective and it's hard for consumers to know how good a hood is. But researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab are developing a new standardized test that manufacturers can use to rate their range hoods.
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Aug 25, 2013 — Surprisingly enough, people have been poaching salmon in their dishwashers for decades. Now one Italian cook has expanded the technique to meats, side dishes and desserts. And she's found a trick to make the method more environmentally friendly.
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May 24, 2013 — Does the kind of charcoal you use really make a difference when it comes to grilling up a tasty steak or other food on the grill? Yes — but deciding which one to use depends on what you're after. Both briquettes and lump charcoal — aka "natural" hardwood charcoal — have their advantages and disadvantages.
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Apr 11, 2013 — Adventurous food shopping get you in trouble? Get help from creative cooks through the Cook Your Cupboard project.
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Apr 10, 2013 — Humans were using cookware as early as 15,000 years ago, according to a new analysis of ancient Japanese ceramic pots. Those first meals? Fish soup.
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Feb 9, 2013 — If your front yard is buried under drifts, treat yourself to some snow cuisine. It's like making lemons out of lemonade — just steer clear of any lemon-colored snow outside, please. Sugar on snow and snow cream are two sweet places to start.
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Feb 6, 2013 — There's nothing better on a cold day than a warm bowl of soup. But when did our ancestors first brew up this tasty broth? New archaeological evidence suggests that soup making could be tens of thousands of years old.
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Dec 8, 2012 — The cheese-and-spinach-filled food called a boyo was once served on the Shabbat tables of Jews who lived in the Ottoman Empire. Today, the Turkish-style pastries are mostly reserved for the holidays.
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