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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Follow The Money

Aug 13, 2014 — A more detailed account about what happened to Lois Lerner's computer is now available. But critics say there are still lots of unanswered questions.
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Jul 23, 2014 — The latest version of the DISCLOSE Act, which would force donor disclosure on outside organizations that engage in election politics, is facing now-familiar opposition from Republican lawmakers.
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Jul 3, 2014 — After a big explosion last year, Texans are worried about what's in nearby chemical plants. Attorney General Greg Abbott, who's running for governor, isn't making it easier for them to find out.
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Jul 1, 2014 — At a time when congressional approval ratings are at rock bottom, the House Ethics Committee quietly made it harder to track privately financed trips taken by members of Congress.
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May 20, 2014 — According to an analysis of Affordable Care Act advertising, an unprecedented amount of money was spent on negative ads attacking the law. And very little was spent defending it.
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Apr 16, 2014 — Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is committing more of his considerable fortune to getting gun safety laws passed. The initiative will support a grass-roots effort that seeks to enlist women.
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Apr 15, 2014 — Topping the list of the former GOP presidential candidate's creditors is an air charter company called Moby Dick Airways. The second biggest creditor? Newt Gingrich himself.
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Apr 9, 2014 — House Republicans cite the former IRS official's attempt to single out Karl Rove's nonprofit — the one that spent $165 million attacking Democrats and helping Republicans.
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Mar 22, 2014 — Each year, the U.S. loads thousands of tons of coal onto a barge and sends it across the Atlantic. It doesn't make a lot of sense, but no one is trying to end the practice.
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Feb 21, 2014 — No fewer than three new superPACs are working to elect their preferred candidates for secretary of state positions, even though officials overseeing elections are supposed to be neutral.
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