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July 23, 2014 | NPR · A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Vice President Joe Biden has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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fishing

Jul 4, 2014 — Laos' government says it needs the money the two dams will generate. But environmentalists and downstream neighbors say the dams are a major threat to fish migration and agriculture.
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Jul 1, 2014 — One-third of the seafood Americans catch is sold abroad, but most of the seafood we eat here is imported and often of lower quality. Why? Author Paul Greenberg says it has to do with American tastes.
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Apr 2, 2014 — Tuna, swordfish and other migratory fishes are being overfished by vessels on the high seas. A new proposal says we should close these international waters for a few years to let the fishes rebound.
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Mar 26, 2014 — California's severe drought has left rivers so dry that young salmon can't make their usual migration. To save the fish and the industry, the state is giving millions of salmon a lift.
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Mar 7, 2014 — If you really want to fight food waste, eat fish heads, the U.N. says. They're nutritious and delicious, but most fish heads get thrown back in the sea as trash or turned into livestock feed.
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Jan 31, 2014 — After the worst year for shrimping in recent memory, fishermen in the Southeast U.S. say they're thankful to catch jellyfish for the Asian market. But conservationists say the expanding jellyfish fishery is a sign of the ocean's decline.
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Jan 23, 2014 — Fish is an important part of a healthful diet, but it can be hard to come by for groups that feed the hungry. A brand-new scheme being launched this week in Maine aims to change that, by getting the state's many sport fishermen to donate catch that would otherwise be discarded.
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Jan 8, 2014 — More than 80 percent of the seafood consumed in the U.S. now comes from abroad. And fishermen in other parts of the world continue to kill not just dolphins but seals and even whales. So conservation groups are calling for tougher import rules to protect sea animals at risk from fishing.
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Jan 2, 2014 — Order cod in a restaurant on Cape Cod, and you might assume you're buying local. But the fish that gave the Cape its name are now so depleted that restaurants are serving cod imported from Iceland. Some activists think it's time America developed a taste for the less popular fish still present in the waters off the Cape.
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Sep 3, 2013 — A report from the International Labor Organization details "deceptive and coercive" labor practices — and even forced labor within the industry. The allegations aren't new, but increase pressure on the Thai government to better regulate the $7 billion industry.
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