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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts met recently on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to come up with ways to resolve their countries' dispute over Ukraine.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Business E-mail Newsletter Weekly

Aug 25, 2014 — Grocers are hoping to entice young consumers and their parents to eat more vegetables by creating kid-focused produce. They're borrowing tactics from the soda and snack industries to win them over.
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Aug 26, 2014 — Both the World Health Organization and the American Heart Association say vapors from electronic cigarettes pose a health threat to bystanders, and that the devices should be regulated like tobacco.
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Aug 27, 2014 — One clothing company whose bottom line was hurt in the wake of bad weather events decided to look to polyester fibers made from recycled plastic bottles.
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Aug 26, 2014 — The tech giant launches new tools for teachers.
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Aug 26, 2014 — Orange juice sales are at their lowest point in 10 years. Florida's citrus industry is reeling from a disease called "greening," while consumers face dozens of other choices in the supermarket aisle.
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Aug 26, 2014 — Colorado is rolling out regulations for the edible-marijuana sector, including "emergency rules," which spell out serving sizes. But for now, most of the dosage education is falling to pot shops.
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Aug 22, 2014 — Argentina calls them vulture funds, but those hedge funds have a legal right to demand payment. Still, is that moral when a nation is the debtor and its citizens will suffer as a result?
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Aug 26, 2014 — Several factors — from a virus sweeping through hog barns to a drought in the Plains states — have driven up the price of pork and beef. But consumers keep buying it.
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Aug 25, 2014 — A researcher says startups Uber and Lyft aren't really ridesharing services. An emerging set of services being tested promises to be more about sharing and less about being like taxis.
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Aug 26, 2014 — A federal program known as HARP could save homeowners who qualify to refinance an average $200 a month. But many who hear about it are suspicious, says Federal Housing Finance Agency chief Mel Watt.
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