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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Doctors

Aug 30, 2014 — A healthy man paid $150 for a battery of tests at his church. The findings frightened him and didn't give his doctor any information that changed the man's care.
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Aug 19, 2014 — In his new memoir, Doctored, Sandeep Jauhar describes a growing discontent among doctors and how it's affecting patients. He says rushed doctors are often practicing "defensive medicine."
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Aug 18, 2014 — Among the more than 4 million procedures for which office-based nurse practitioners and physician assistants independently billed Medicare in 2012, more than half were for dermatological surgeries.
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Aug 17, 2014 — Patients are more satisfied with their care when doctors share their medical notes. But letting patients see what doctors put in medical records has long been taboo. That's starting to change.
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Aug 7, 2014 — Medical school is now one year shorter for aspiring doctors. An initiative at the University of California, Davis aims to produce more primary care doctors with less med school debt.
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Jul 29, 2014 — We spend $15 billion a year training doctors but end up with a medical workforce that doesn't meet the nation's health care needs, according to an Institute of Medicine Report.
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Jul 24, 2014 — Doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital are working on ways to help patients better understand their chances of suffering heart attacks and surgical complications.
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Jul 20, 2014 — Back pain is common. Nearly all of us have at least one episode in our lives, and two-thirds of us will have it repeatedly. Exercise, though it may seem counterintuitive, is often the best medicine.
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Jul 16, 2014 — A Houston internist who supported the Affordable Care Act now finds that many of her patients who bought less expensive coverage have trouble getting the specialized care they need.
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Jun 26, 2014 — Results trump courtesies when a person's health is on the line, some people said. No, others responded, saying that proper treatment also requires a human touch.
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