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July 31, 2014 | NPR · In Gaza, the price of drinking water has soared, there's little electricity — and another shortage is beginning: people displaced by the fighting are waiting in long lines to get food.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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WikiLeaks

Apr 23, 2014 — The ex-U.S. Army intelligence analyst formerly known as Bradley Manning, made the request to reflect a change in gender identity.
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Aug 21, 2013 — The 25-year-old former Army intelligence analyst was responsible for the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history. In 2010, he gave WikiLeaks more than 700,000 documents. A judge handed down his sentence Wednesday. The maximum punishment possible was 90 years in prison.
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Aug 14, 2013 — The Army private told a military judge that he understands now that he should have worked through the system. Manning has been convicted in the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history.
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Aug 1, 2013 — After Russia granted NSA leaker Edward Snowden a one-year asylum, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said the move "undermines a long history of cooperation."
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Jul 31, 2013 — The severity of Bradley Manning's punishment is expected to hinge on his motives. The former Army intelligence analyst was acquitted of aiding the enemy, which would have put him in jeopardy of a life sentence. He was found guilty of other serious charges, from theft to espionage, for giving thousands of classified U.S. documents to WikiLeaks.
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Jul 26, 2013 — Pfc. Bradley Manning, argued the defense, released classified information in an attempt to spark debate about things he found troubling about war and American diplomacy.
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Jul 25, 2013 — At issue is whether Pfc. Bradley Manning knowingly provided intelligence to enemies of the U.S. The aiding-the-enemy charge is punishable by life in prison.
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Jul 18, 2013 — That is the most serious charge against Pfc. Bradley Manning. It is punishable by life in prison.
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Jul 3, 2013 — The listening device was found last month, says Ecuador's foreign minister, Ricardo Patiño. He called the incident another example of a deterioration of ethics on an international level.
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Jul 2, 2013 — Several countries have already turned down requests from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, who remains in legal limbo at a Moscow airport. He wants to avoid being sent to the U.S. to face prosecution. There's speculation in Russia that he might leave with Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who is visiting.
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