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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Your Health

Sep 1, 2014 — When we talk, we focus on the "content" words — the ones that convey information. But the tiny words that tie our sentences together have a lot to say about power and relationships.
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Sep 1, 2014 — Gabrielle Nuki hopes to be a doctor someday. So when the 16-year-old found out that she could work as a fake patient helping to train medical students, she jumped at the chance.
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Aug 29, 2014 — You probably haven't thought about whether your phone could help diagnose alcohol withdrawal. Well, it can. An app for doctors measures tremors and may help tell if someone's faking it to get drugs.
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Aug 28, 2014 — Everybody worries about losing eyesight or hearing, but the sense of smell may help people stay safe. People with impaired odor detection are more likely to eat spoiled food or let pans catch on fire.
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Aug 28, 2014 — If you're grossed out by the idea that tiny relatives of scorpions are living in the pores of your nose, you're not alone. But everybody's got Demodex mites, a study finds. And they're kind of cute.
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Aug 26, 2014 — Advocates for people with autism applauded the move, but some states are concerned about the costs of covering a wide range of therapy for children with autism.
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Aug 25, 2014 — The science is clear that teenagers need more than eight hours of sleep a night. The nation's pediatricians say school districts need to buck up and change schedules to let kids sleep later.
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Aug 25, 2014 — By age 40, the brains of people with Down syndrome start to resemble those of Alzheimer's patients. Scientists hope to speed up Alzheimer's drug development by studying people with Down syndrome.
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Aug 22, 2014 — Nobody knew how people in Southern California were getting infected with the life-threatening fungus C. gattii. A 13-year-old helped figure out the source: three types of trees.
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Aug 22, 2014 — An insurer denied free coverage for NuvaRing, a small birth control device that works for three weeks at a time by releasing hormones similar to those used by birth control pills.
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