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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Culture

Apr 16, 2014 — The right person can make all the difference in your life. Marcelo Gleiser has benefitted from more than one mentor in his life. Now he gives his time to others and encourages you to do the same.
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Apr 8, 2014 — A lot can happen in a millisecond, if you have the right tools. Commentator Adam Frank says the rise of high-frequency financial trading marks the invention of a new time logic for humanity.
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Apr 6, 2014 — Popular physicist Brian Greene just opened the virtual doors to his World Science U, a resource for those who want to know more. Commentator Adam Frank says it's worth the trip.
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Apr 4, 2014 — In RoboCop, a character named Dreyfus is at odds with one named Dennett. In real life, Dennett is one of AIs great champions, and Dreyfus one of its most trenchant critics.
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Apr 3, 2014 — Revisiting the topic of eating insects, anthropologist Barbara J. King samples some cricket cookies and interviews the founder of Little Herds, a nonprofit dedicated to entomophagy.
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Mar 31, 2014 — A trip to the museum is all about learning. But maybe you have something to share, too. Commentator Tania Lombrozo flags a case of uninvited public participation at a London show.
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Mar 27, 2014 — Our understanding of chimpanzees, and of ourselves, has been changed in spectacular ways by Jane Goodall's work. Next week Goodall will turn 80; let's send her a message of thanks and congratulations.
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Mar 25, 2014 — Once in a while Hollywood produces a gem, says physicist Adam Frank. He cherishes movies that fold together science and humanity in a way that allows us to look at ourselves and our society anew.
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Mar 18, 2014 — Life, in all its forms, is amazing. Neil deGrasse Tyson captures some of this wonder in the latest episode of Cosmos. But commentator Alva No says he also seemed to avoid the biggest question of all.
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Mar 15, 2014 — The jury is still out of brain-fitness programs. And this shouldn't surprise us. Getting our heads in shape isn't likely to be easier than getting our bodies fit, says Alva No.
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