Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
AP
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
Courtesy of Prime Group
September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff, whom the group threatened to kill two weeks ago.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
NPR
September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

research

Aug 25, 2014 — By age 40, the brains of people with Down syndrome start to resemble those of Alzheimer's patients. Scientists hope to speed up Alzheimer's drug development by studying people with Down syndrome.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 21, 2014 — A new study finds cancer affects even simple, ancient multicellular organisms — which means the disease and the deaths it causes may simply be a part of life.
Comments |
Aug 14, 2014 — An international team of scientists is experimenting with a potential drug to block the production of a protein linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Comments |
Aug 1, 2014 — Researchers have mapped the travels of 150,000 artists, politicians and religious leaders over the past 2,000 years. The videos reveal how cultural achievements ebb and flow across the U.S and Europe.
Comments |
Jul 22, 2014 — Researchers have stumbled on an ingenious idea: Use bubble wrap as a cheap test tube and petri dish. They've even run tests on blood that's sitting inside the poppable packaging. So how does it work?
Comments |
Jul 7, 2014 — The tobacco industry played an influential role in the funding and popularization of stress research. A vast document archive details the relationships between cigarette makers and key scientists.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 2, 2014 — Scientific papers that claimed stem cells could be made in the laboratory simply by dipping regular cells in acid didn't hold up under scrutiny. Now the work is being retracted because of errors.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 27, 2014 — Hospital-acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus are a major health problem. Learning how staph can gum up tiny tubes like catheters may help prevent infections.
Comments |
Jun 26, 2014 — This technique for manipulating genes borrows a strategy from the way bacteria fight viruses. It's still experimental, but the possibilities excite medical researchers hoping to tailor treatments.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 19, 2014 — Scientists have figured out how botulinum toxin moves from the intestine into the bloodstream. Specialized molecules that serve as carriers for the toxin provide clues about its potency.
Comments |
more research from NPR