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April 22, 2014 | NPR · A key part of that strategy is the Trans Pacific Partnership — a free trade agreement among 12 Asian-Pacific nations. The trade pact would influence geopolitics and the reshape global trade.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · Tuesday marks one month since a hillside gave way and wiped out a rural neighborhood. Crews have been looking for victims' remains ever since. On Monday, the official death toll increased by 2 to 41.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Supreme Court on Tuesday hears arguments in two high-profile cases that could affect video sharing on the Internet, and the telling of untruths in the political marketplace.
 

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April 22, 2014 | NPR · Washington Gov. Jay Inslee offers an update on the deadly mudslides near the town of Oso in March. President Obama is visiting Oso on Tuesday.
 
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April 22, 2014 | NPR · The Army plans to take all Apache attack helicopters from the National Guard. The Guard says that's an insult, but Army leaders say it's not personal — it's just about saving money.
 
April 22, 2014 | NPR · The White House named Neil Eggleston its new top lawyer. He'll have to muster his legal and political skills to deal with a divided Congress and multiple investigations of the Obama's administration.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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NPR News Investigations

Apr 1, 2014 — NPR examines previously undisclosed financial records from Daystar Television. Those files raise issues as basic as the definition of "church" and as grand as the role of government in religion.
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Mar 31, 2014 — The agency tasked with finding the remains of over 83,000 service members had been reluctant to use up-to-date technology, but will now move toward a DNA-led approach to identifying the missing.
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Jan 6, 2014 — Why have so many soldiers committed suicide in recent years? The Army is looking beyond post-traumatic stress and asking whether bad commanders and destructive leadership are taking a toll.
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Dec 5, 2013 — Federal regulators are cracking down on banks that are offering services called deposit advances. Many argue that the service is the same as payday loans and could lead consumers into a cycle of debt.
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Nov 6, 2013 — Tax-exempt social welfare groups have become the vehicle of choice for big political contributions. NPR, in partnership with the Center for Responsive Politics, traces the money moving through a Washington, D.C., group, and the law that makes this activity possible.
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Nov 5, 2013 — The reversal of a conservation law court decision to protect Michigan's Au Sable River is an unintended outcome from large donations by anonymous funders funneled through tax-exempt organizations. Known as 501(c)(4)s, these groups are becoming a vehicle of choice for big donors to hide large political donations.
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Oct 2, 2013 — Could government agents really get access to all your private data in less than a minute? Experts say no but warn we are moving in that direction.
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Oct 1, 2013 — Data we voluntarily provide online — such as on dating websites — may not stay with that site. While not always obvious, websites commonly allow other companies to track user behavior.
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Sep 30, 2013 — NPR and the Center for Investigative Reporting are documenting just how vivid the typical person's digital picture has become — and how easy it can be for others to see it.
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May 3, 2013 — A white off-duty constable shot and killed a paraplegic black man in Fayette, Miss., in 1965. Despite new witnesses who have memories of what happened that day, there's still not enough evidence to say whether Jasper Burchfield's claim of self-defense is true.
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