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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Photography

Aug 16, 2014 — Scott Olson, a photojournalist with Getty Images, has captured some of the striking images of the protests in Ferguson, Mo., following the police shooting of Michael Brown.
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Aug 14, 2014 — James Ostrer slathered himself and a few friends with cream cheese and then piled candy, doughnuts and fries on top. As he photographed these human sculptures, he found a sort of catharsis.
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Aug 12, 2014 — John Keedy used to be uncomfortable talking about his problems with anxiety, but not anymore. He hopes his series of photos will help others with mental illness see that they're not alone.
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Aug 5, 2014 — Audie Cornish talks with freelance photographer Tommy Trenchard, who has been shooting in Sierra Leone the last two years. He offers an on-the-ground account of the Ebola virus outbreak.
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Jul 11, 2014 — An eagle soars above a park in Indonesia. A waterfall in Mexico is seen from high above. Those are two of the best images taken by aerial drones, according to an online contest.
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Jul 10, 2014 — Readers responded strongly to our series about caregiving, especially one photo of a father caring for his son with cerebral palsy. Some said it was demeaning. Others said it revealed great love.
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Jun 28, 2014 — NPR photographer David Gilkey went to Cuba and made images of the one thing his editor told him to avoid: cars.
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Jun 19, 2014 — A snapshot of goat-grabbing, a popular sport in Afghanistan.
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May 30, 2014 — Environmentalists say we should eat up animals that are an ecological nuisance. Problem is, they don't usually look very tasty. A photo project tries to alter our perception of these critters.
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May 29, 2014 — People live out of their cars for all sorts of reasons. Photographer Andrew Waits set out to document their stories. He asked dozens of people across five states why they had left their houses behind.
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