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April 23, 2014 | NPR · They say they were placed on the list for refusing to inform on other Muslims. The suit is part of a broad wave of cases challenging the secretive no-fly list and U.S. counterterrorism strategies.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Activists say a federal law that allows employers to pay people with disabilities pennies per hour is out of date and should be changed. But some say the law is a lifeline for the disabled.
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · Shakespeare's Globe Theater aims to take the Bard's iconic play to every country in the world. It will perform everywhere from prestigious theaters to Pacific island beaches.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · In the '60s, submarines picked up a mysterious quacking sound in the Southern Ocean. This "bio-duck," as it came to be known, has been heard on and off ever since, but scientists haven't been able to trace it — until now. New research shows that the quack is coming from minke whales, but researchers still don't know why.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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History

Apr 23, 2014 — Bacteria can make a bread rise and give it a cheesy flavor. That's the secret ingredient in salt rising bread, which dates to the late 1700s in Appalachia, when bakers didn't have yeast on hand.
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Apr 23, 2014 — Archaeologists in South Carolina are excavating a Union officer prisoner-of-war camp site, hoping to find historical artifacts before they are buried under new construction.
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Apr 22, 2014 — To mark the 50th anniversary of the 1964 New York World's Fair, we turn back to some predictions that The New York Times commissioned Isaac Asimov to make on the occasion. He got many things right.
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Apr 21, 2014 — The Library of Congress recently added 25 new recordings to its National Recording Registry, but none of them were hip-hop or rap songs. Did it miss a beat?
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Apr 20, 2014 — Today, everyone calls it a peanut. Southerners might also say 'goober.' But before the Civil War, there were a dozen names for that humble legume, and it wasn't at all clear which one would win out.
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Apr 20, 2014 — It seems like a simple question: How many parts can you divide a line into? The troublesome answer was square at the root of two of Europe's greatest social crises.
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Apr 20, 2014 — Harriet Quimby was the first American woman to get a pilot's license. It was 1910; women could not even vote, but Quimby wanted to see the world.
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Apr 18, 2014 — In the fight against Islamic extremism, the president of the Muslim Public Affairs Council says that intervention within the community is more effective than external surveillance and secrecy.
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Apr 18, 2014 — The mass shooting at Columbine High School spurred schools to adopt "zero tolerance" policies. Do they work? NPR Education Correspondent Claudio Sanchez and former principal Bill Bond discuss.
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Apr 17, 2014 — Guest Host Celeste Headlee learns more about the United States' deportation policies from Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute.
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