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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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On Disabilities

Jul 28, 2014 — Offering a homeless person an apartment with access to a doctor and social services may be cheaper than paying for emergency room visits and jail or shelter stays. But should Medicaid help with rent?
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Jul 22, 2014 — The Ormia ochracea fly has sophisticated little ears — it can locate crickets by calculating their chirps. Those super-ears are inspiring the next generation of microphones for human hearing aids.
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Jul 22, 2014 — Spencer West was born with a genetic disorder that led to both his legs being amputated. West tells host Michel Martin about how he climbed Mount Kilimanjaro using just his hands and arms.
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Jul 18, 2014 — Paralympic snowboarder and "Dancing With the Stars" finalist Amy Purdy tells how losing her legs at age 19 enabled her to achieve more than she ever dreamed.
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Jul 17, 2014 — Sierra Sandison couldn't imagine how she would hide an insulin pump during beauty pageants. So she decided to show it off for the Miss Idaho pageant. She won. Type 1 diabetics say they won, too.
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Jul 13, 2014 — Health reporter Kathleen Raven found out she had a hearing problem when she was 5. She got her first pair of hearing aids in 1993, but as the technology improves, she's still learning new sounds.
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Jul 10, 2014 — Juan Rendon was not a fan. Then he co-directed This Is Not a Ball, a documentary that took him to the slums of Brazil and to an amputee league in Sierra Leone.
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Jul 10, 2014 — Readers responded strongly to our series about caregiving, especially one photo of a father caring for his son with cerebral palsy. Some said it was demeaning. Others said it revealed great love.
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Jul 9, 2014 — Henry Wanyoike lost his sight two years after graduating from high school. That didn't stop him from running — and bringing the joy of sports to other disabled Kenyans.
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Jul 5, 2014 — Judy and James Lee's lives revolve around providing 24-hour care to their 16-year-old son. As they get older, they worry about who will eventually take care of him.
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