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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | KWMU · The violence at night in Ferguson, Mo., has calmed down for now. However, there have been more than 160 people arrested since the protests began. Police records offer a sense of who they are.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Humans

Aug 21, 2014 — A new study finds cancer affects even simple, ancient multicellular organisms — which means the disease and the deaths it causes may simply be a part of life.
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Aug 20, 2014 — There's a link between how children draw at age 4 and how well they perform on intelligence tests at age 14, researchers say.
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Aug 19, 2014 — Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
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Aug 17, 2014 — Invasive fish like snakeheads and Asian carp are threatening to wipe out aquatic ecosystems across the U.S. So chefs and environmental agencies are encouraging their communities to eat them up.
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Aug 15, 2014 — The Affordable Care Act has allowed many young adults to stay on their parents' insurance. A study suggests the coverage may be helping more of them get treatment for mental health issues.
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Aug 15, 2014 — There are many apps and services to encourage us to do all that we set out (and want) to do — walk the dog, call our mom, eat healthier. But is a reminder, or an alert, enough?
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Aug 15, 2014 — There are happy snails. There are lonely snails. And there are lost snails. This one is lost. Totally. But it sings.
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Aug 14, 2014 — As the Ebola outbreak rages in West Africa, it is also unfolding — in a virtual sense — inside the computers of scientists trying to predict how far the outbreak will spread and when it will end.
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Aug 14, 2014 — Dr. Gil Yosipovitch is a leading scientist in the field of itch. He says he hopes to gain more respect for the debilitating power of chronic itch — and to get more doctors on the search for a cure.
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Aug 14, 2014 — James Ostrer slathered himself and a few friends with cream cheese and then piled candy, doughnuts and fries on top. As he photographed these human sculptures, he found a sort of catharsis.
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