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April 21, 2014 | NPR · More than 200 people remain missing after the ferry capsized last week. One family was told their daughter was dead instead of missing. It turns out authorities had confused her for another girl.
 
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April 21, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.
 
April 21, 2014 | NPR · Hamid Mir, one of Pakistan's most famous journalists, was shot and wounded by gunmen as he was driving down a busy street in Karachi. It's the second such attack this month on a journalist.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
Courtesy of Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes
April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Most E-Mailed Stories Newsletter

Apr 13, 2014 — The bronze sculpture depicting Jesus huddled under a blanket on a park bench has provoked praise and complaints — and a call to the police — in its new North Carolina neighborhood.
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Apr 14, 2014 — For many older men, life gets better and better — until it gets worse.
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Apr 14, 2014 — The weather may play havoc with the sky-watching on the East Coast, though much of the Midwest and West ought to get a good view.
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Apr 15, 2014 — To see if low blood sugar sours even good relationships, scientists used an unusual tool: voodoo dolls representing spouses. As hunger levels rose, so did the number of pins.
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Apr 16, 2014 — Parents often complain that smartphones keep their kids distracted from conversation. What happens when it's the other way around, when kids can't get their smartphone-glued parents' attention?
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Mar 11, 2014 — This winter's unexpected arctic bird invasion has given owl researchers a rare opportunity. They're fitting a few of the errant owls with GPS backpacks to track their return to the Arctic.
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Mar 10, 2014 — World War I shook up the world in a dramatic way — and from that chaos emerged inventions, words and other things we still use today. Can you identify them all?
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Dec 17, 2013 — Vitamin deficiencies can cause deadly diseases like scurvy, and other major health problems like spina bifida. But for most people, adding a multivitamin to their daily routine doesn't affect their health at all, studies say. Still, 40 percent of Americans continue to take multivitamins.
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Dec 17, 2013 — The idea seemed sensible: Send young elephants from a crowded national park in South Africa to an emptier one, where they could form a new herd and thrive. The problem? Elephants need elders. Without them, all hell breaks loose.
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Dec 16, 2013 — They look, at first, like dangerously protruding rocks on this towering, almost vertical wall in the Italian Alps. But then, uncannily, they move. What are they? And why don't they fall off? What are they doing?
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