Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
EPA/Landov
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
Courtesy of Mark Pierce
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AFP/Getty Images
August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Research News

Aug 21, 2014 — A new study finds cancer affects even simple, ancient multicellular organisms — which means the disease and the deaths it causes may simply be a part of life.
Comments |
Aug 21, 2014 — Steve Inskeep talks to Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan about why non-violent resistance campaigns work better than armed rebellion. Their article on the subject is in Foreign Affairs magazine.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 20, 2014 — There's a link between how children draw at age 4 and how well they perform on intelligence tests at age 14, researchers say.
Comments |
Aug 19, 2014 — The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 19, 2014 — David Greene talks with Roger Morris, vice president of the National Insurance Crime Bureau, about the reasons for the dramatic decline in car thefts over the past 20 years.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 19, 2014 — How much does it cost to raise a child these days? The government says it costs $245,340. That's for a child born in 2013 and covers the period from birth to age 18. College not included.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 18, 2014 — Using a new technology, scientists have created a vaccine for an emerging mosquito-borne virus. The vaccine was safe and produced some degree of immunity in a preliminary study.
Comments |
Aug 18, 2014 — An analysis by two economists finds that winners of the medal, the most significant prize in mathematics, become significantly less productive in their chosen field of study after they win the prize.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 17, 2014 — A scientific survey of coral reefs off the Florida keys is being done using the same fish-eye camera lenses that Google uses to capture street views. Scientists will use the images for research.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 17, 2014 — The inspiration for modern MRI brain scanners was built before World War I began, the Titanic sank, and humans took flight. Now neuroscientists are trying to give its inventor his due credit.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Research News from NPR